News | June 23, 2014

New Study Sheds Light on Risk Factors for Atrial Fibrillation and Cardioembolic Stroke

June 23, 2014 — Researchers have announced the results of a four-year study that used 3-D echocardiography to examine the role of mid left atrial cross sectional area (LACSA) as a risk factor for cardioembolic (CE) stroke, atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke recurrence. Atrial fibrillation is a common heart problem, affecting 2.6 million Americans per year. Strokes resulting from atrial fibrillation and heart disease are typically more severe, as they are associated with significant debilities and higher death rates.

“One of the challenges in treating patients with heart disease and AF is predicting which patients are at higher risk for stroke. Our study identifies a novel imaging sign that can be obtained with echocardiography, a common medical diagnostic tool that uses ultrasound to image the heart, in order to improve our ability to predict which patients are at greater risk for stroke,” said primary investigator Timothy C. Tan, Ph.D., MBBS, clinical and research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. “Ultimately, this may help physicians develop more targeted and effective treatment plans for patients with heart disease and AF.”

Tan and his colleagues first used 3-D echo and customized software to analyze a small cohort of 40 ischemic stroke patients, to compare left atrial (LA) remodeling between patients with AF and those without AF. Those results, combined with flow dynamics analysis, allowed the researchers to derive a simplified echocardiographic parameter using 2-D echo measurements to calculate LACSA. Finally, the researchers validated their new formula in a separate group of 1,275 ischemic stroke patients.

Researchers on the study, “Left Atrial Cross Sectional Area, a Marker of Left Atrial Shape, is a Novel Risk Factor for Cardioembolic Stroke and Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke,” included Tan, Octavio Pontes-Neto, Mark Handschumacher, Maria C. Nunes, Yong-Hyun Park, Victoria Piro, Yuan Jiao, Gyeong-Moon Kim, Johanna Helenius, Cashel O'Brien, Xin Zeng, Karen Furie, Hakan Ay and Judy Hung from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

The results of the study were presented at the 25th annual scientific sessions of the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) in Portland, Ore.

For more information: www.asecho.org

Related Content

Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 31, 2020
July 31, 2020 — In the thick of the COVID-19 eme
A and B, Lung ultrasound images obtained with convex (A) and linear (B) probes. Multiple confluent B-lines (arrows), patchy pulmonary consolidation (asterisk, B), and thickened pleural line (between arrowheads, A) are visualized. C, Chest CT image shows reticular and interlobular septal thickening and patchy, focal opacities associated with architectural distortion. This patient was classified in critical group and was assigned to severe group for statistical analysis.

A and B, Lung ultrasound images obtained with convex (A) and linear (B) probes. Multiple confluent B-lines (arrows), patchy pulmonary consolidation (asterisk, B), and thickened pleural line (between arrowheads, A) are visualized. C, Chest CT image shows reticular and interlobular septal thickening and patchy, focal opacities associated with architectural distortion. This patient was classified in critical group and was assigned to severe group for statistical analysis.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 23, 2020
July 23, 2020 — 
Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S. launch of the SuperSonic MACH 40 ultrasound system, expanding the company’s suite of ultrasound technologies with its first premium, cart-based system.
News | Breast Imaging | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S.
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac
A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane