News | Radiation Dose Management | February 05, 2021

New Imaging Intellectual Property for Lower Radiation Dose

Real Time Imaging Technologies LLC iannounced that it has received U.S. Patent No. 10,898,070 IMAGING APPARATUS AND METHODS which covers the company’s methods for incorporating microlens into X-ray imaging detectors that enables significantly lower radiation dose without compromising image resolution.

Getty Images

February 5, 2021 — Real Time Imaging Technologies LLC has received U.S. Patent No. 10,898,070 IMAGING APPARATUS AND METHODS which covers the company’s methods for incorporating microlens into X-ray imaging detectors that enables significantly lower radiation dose without compromising image resolution.

“The microlens significance rests on its capacity to efficiently collect and focus the low radiation low light that would have otherwise fallen onto the non-sensitive areas of the collector and thereby increasing detector’s fill factor and quantum efficiency. This will translate into more sensitive x-ray detectors for low-dose imaging acquisition and a pixel size reduction for an increased spatial resolution and diagnostic confidence, said Daniel Uzbelger Feldman, DDS, the inventor of this breakthrough for medical, dental, and veterinary X-rays imaging detection.

“Today’s announcement broadens our current expansive patent portfolio covering important diagnostic and procedural imaging technology. Our technology is designed to assist physicians, dentists and vets to be able to visualize and navigate procedures more safely and efficiently with significantly less radiation dose exposure,” said Michael Sinsheimer, Chairman and Co-founder of Real Time Imaging Technologies, LLC.

For more information: www.neoimagingtech.com

 

 

Related Content

Images in 69-year-old man with biopsy-confirmed Gleason score 7 (3+4) prostate cancer. (a) Pretreatment axial T2-weighted fast spin-echo MRI scan (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 3820/97) shows tumor in midline anterior transition zone (arrow). (b) Intraoperative MRI scan shows contoured rectal wall (red line), prostate margin (blue outline), and region of interest (orange outline). Because the urethra was included in planned treatment volume, a suprapubic catheter was placed for continuous bladder drainage during treatment. (c) Intraoperative MRI scan shows focused ultrasound beam path (blue) overlaid on treatment plan. Rectangles illustrate each sonication spot. (d) Thermal map image obtained during treatment with heat deposition color coded in red overlaid on sonication spot. (e) Axial gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI scan (230/2.97) obtained immediately after treatment shows devascularized ablated volume (arrows). (f) Corresponding T2-weighted fast spin-echo MRI scan (3820/97) at 5 months after ablation shows complete involution of transition zone. All seven cores from treatment area margins were negative for cancer at biopsy. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

News | Prostate Cancer | February 05, 2021
February 5, 2021 — A technique that delivers...
Bright spots indicate that cancer cells have responded to a one-day challenge with estrogen in this positron emission tomography (PET) scan of a woman with breast cancer. In a small study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that only women whose tumors responded to estrogen challenge benefited from hormone therapy. The findings could help doctors choose the treatments most likely to help their patients. Image courtesy of Farrokh Dehdashti

Bright spots indicate that cancer cells have responded to a one-day challenge with estrogen in this positron emission tomography (PET) scan of a woman with breast cancer. In a small study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that only women whose tumors responded to estrogen challenge benefited from hormone therapy. The findings could help doctors choose the treatments most likely to help their patients. Image courtesy of Farrokh Dehdashti

News | PET Imaging | February 03, 2021
February 3, 2021 — Hormone therapy commonly is given as a targeted treatment for women whose cancer cells carry recep
Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Kaiting Yang, a postdoctoral researcher in Weichselbaum's lab.

Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Kaiting Yang, a postdoctoral researcher in Weichselbaum's lab. Image courtesy of Ludwig Cancer Research

News | Radiation Therapy | January 28, 2021
January 28, 2021 — A study led by Ludwig Chicago
MRI Targeted biopsy is performed using cognitive fusion more easily with anatomical guidance based on the radiology report. MRI targets can be identified quickly in real-time along with micro-ultrasound targets, which may have been missed on MRI.

MRI Targeted biopsy is performed using cognitive fusion more easily with anatomical guidance based on the radiology report. MRI targets can be identified quickly in real-time along with micro-ultrasound targets, which may have been missed on MRI. Image courtesy of Exact Imaging

Feature | Prostate Cancer | January 20, 2021 | By Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D.
Historically when a patient had an elevated PSA (prostate specific antigen) test their urologist would take the next
The exceptionally high dose rate of the FLASH Beam is 3,000 times higher than normal therapy treatment (300 Gray per second vs. 0.1 Gray per second, Gray being a standard unit measuring absorbed radiation). Instead of treatment over 20 seconds, an entire treatment is completed in 6 milliseconds, giving the therapy its nickname, "FLASH." Image courtesy of Brian Pogue, PhD

The exceptionally high dose rate of the FLASH Beam is 3,000 times higher than normal therapy treatment (300 Gray per second vs. 0.1 Gray per second, Gray being a standard unit measuring absorbed radiation). Instead of treatment over 20 seconds, an entire treatment is completed in 6 milliseconds, giving the therapy its nickname, "FLASH." Image courtesy of Brian Pogue, PhD

News | Linear Accelerators | January 20, 2021
January 20, 2021 — A joint team of researchers from Radiation Oncology at Dartmouth's and...