News | Population Health | January 10, 2019

Mobile App Data Collection Shows Promise for Population Health Surveys

Researchers evaluate Medable Inc.’s mobile health survey solution as potential way to eliminate barriers to large-scale data collection

Mobile App Data Collection Shows Promise for Population Health Surveys

January 10, 2019 — Mobile app data collection can bring access to more potential clinical study participants, reduce clinical study timeframes and create more comprehensive sample sizes, according to research published in Survey Practice.1

“It is critical that health and other national surveys represent the voice and experience of all Americans,” said senior author Ingrid Oakley-Girvan, senior vice president of research and strategy at Medable Inc., research director at the Public Health Institute, and associate member of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection and the Stanford Cancer Institute. “Smartphone survey data can help policy makers allocate resources in realtime to respond to disease outbreaks such as opioid addiction. Our work sheds light on the value of smartphones to address declining participation rates, rising survey costs and poor coverage across demographics.”

Oakley-Girvan and co-authors Yasamin Miller, Cyrus DiCiccio, Juan Lavista, Cheryl Gore-Felton, Amanda Richardson, Carlos Acle, Jeff Hancock, Lorene Nelson and Oxana Palesh were interested in the impact that smartphones can have on health data survey collection.

They studied the response to a mobile app survey, built on the Medable Inc. platform, by deploying it in a college student population to determine if students would download the app, and to determine if the app would retain individuals in a study, two significant barriers being faced by researchers conducting population health surveys.  

“Our findings show that mobile app data collection can fundamentally change survey research,” said Miller, first author and founder and managing director of YMG. “Using mobile apps could create a shift in health surveys, which could eventually lead to faster and more accurate health policies and cures.”

Declining response rates to traditional telephone surveys are hindering researchers in their abilities to recruit and study the most pressing medical issues. The study used Medable Inc.’s platform to provide efficient real-world data collection, monitoring and analysis.

The researchers partnered with faculty from Stanford University, the Cancer Prevention Institute of California (CPIC), OneTree, YMG and Castleton University, to leverage Medable’s platform to collect behavioral health and substance use data. The researchers built and deployed two apps in under six weeks.

Medable’s end-to-end (E2E) platform enables researchers without developer expertise to create and deploy HIPAA-compliant iOS and Android apps for clinical trials or research studies. “Creating mobile applications on a short timeline would not have been possible without the use of Medable’s Axon,” said Miller. “Medable’s platform enabled team members without coding expertise to contribute and play key roles in developing the study.”

For more information: www.medable.com

Reference

1. Miller Y., DiCiccio C., Lavista J., et al. Smart(phone) Approaches to Mobile App Data Collection. Survey Practice, Dec. 3, 2018. DOI: 10.29115/SP-2018-0030

Related Content

NIH Study of Brain Energy Patterns Provides New Insights into Alcohol Effects

NIH scientists present a new method for combining measures of brain activity (left) and glucose consumption (right) to study regional specialization and to better understand the effects of alcohol on the human brain. Image courtesy of Ehsan Shokri-Kojori, Ph.D., of NIAAA.

News | Neuro Imaging | March 22, 2019
March 22, 2019 — Assessing the patterns of energy use and neuronal activity simultaneously in the human brain improve
Older Biologic Age Linked to Elevated Breast Cancer Risk
News | Women's Health | March 19, 2019
Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person’s age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according...
HeartFlow Analysis Successfully Stratifies Heart Disease Patients at One Year
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | March 19, 2019
Late-breaking results confirm the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis enables...
DrChrono and 3D4Medical Partner to Bring 3-D Interactive Modeling to Physician Practices
News | Advanced Visualization | March 18, 2019
DrChrono Inc. and 3D4Medical have teamed up so practices across the United States can access 3-D interactive modeling...
PET Scans Show Biomarkers Could Spare Some Breast Cancer Patients from Chemotherapy
News | PET Imaging | March 18, 2019
A new study positron emission tomography (PET) scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Non-Contrast MRI Effective in Monitoring MS Patients
News | Neuro Imaging | March 18, 2019
Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach...
Bay Labs Announces New Data on EchoGPS, AutoEF AI Software at ACC.19
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | March 15, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) company Bay Labs announced the presentation of two studies assessing performance of the...
CT, Mammograms Offer Clues to Preventing Heart Problems After Cancer Treatment
News | Cardio-oncology | March 13, 2019
An imaging procedure commonly performed before starting cancer treatment can provide valuable clues about a patient's...
Iron Measurements With MRI Reveal Stroke's Impact on Brain

Images show illustrative examples of visual R2? modifications within substantia nigra (SN) at baseline (24-72 h) and follow-up (1 y) in striatum (participants 1 and 2) and control groups (participants 3 and 4). Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Stroke | March 12, 2019
March 12, 2019 — A simple ...