News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 20, 2018

Konica Minolta Brings Motion to X-ray With Dynamic Digital Radiography

DDR technology rapidly captures sequential radiographs in a single exam to observe the dynamic interaction of anatomical structures

Konica Minolta Brings Motion to X-ray With Dynamic Digital Radiography

November 20, 2018 – Konica Minolta Healthcare is bringing digital radiography (DR) to life with the ability to visualize movement using conventional X-ray. Known as Dynamic Digital Radiography (DDR) or X-ray in Motion, this new modality captures movement in a single exam and allows the clinician to observe the dynamic interaction of anatomical structures, such as soft tissue and bone, with physiological changes over time. The value of DDR in thoracic imaging is promising, according to the company, allowing clinicians to observe chest wall, heart and lung motion during respiration. DDR goes beyond pulmonary function; Konica Minolta is exploring its use in orthopedic applications of the spine and extremities.

This new capability will be showcased at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

DDR is an enhanced version of a standard DR system that rapidly acquires up to 15 sequential radiographs per second for up to 20 seconds of physiological movement, resulting in 300 X-ray images with a dose equivalent to about two standard X-rays. Since the DDR system also performs all conventional X-ray studies as well as motion radiographic studies, it is a cost-effective solution that provides greater diagnostic capability in an economical package.

In the U.S., 74 percent of all radiologic studies are radiography1 and nearly 44 percent of hospital-based X-ray imaging exams are thoracic2. While access to computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine may be limited in regions throughout the world, X-ray is an essential primary diagnostic tool that is widely available in developed nations at a fraction of the cost. There are also potential cost savings for healthcare systems globally by reducing the need for more advanced, and more expensive, imaging techniques.

Dynamic Digital Radiography is not U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared in the U.S.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

 

References

1. Herrmann TL, Fauber TL, Gill J, et al. Best practices in digital radiography. Radiol Technol. 2012 Sep-Oct;84(1):83-9.

2 IMV Market Research, 2017 X-ray/DR/CR Market Outlook, Sept. 2017.

Related Content

FDA Clears GE's Deep Learning Image Reconstruction Engine
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 19, 2019
GE Healthcare has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of its Deep Learning Image...
Oxipit Introduces Multilingual Support for ChestEye AI Imaging Suite
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 16, 2019
The CE-certified ChestEye artificial intelligence (AI) imaging suite by Oxipit is now available in seven European...
iCAD Appoints Stacey Stevens as President
News | Radiology Business | April 16, 2019
iCAD Inc. recently announced that Stacey Stevens has been named president. As president, Stevens will have expanded...
compressed breast during mammography.
360 Photos | 360 View Photos | April 16, 2019
A 360 view of a simulated breast compression for a...
Radiology Publishes Roadmap for AI in Medical Imaging
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 16, 2019
In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future...
Check-Cap Initiates U.S. Pilot Study of C-Scan for Colorectal Cancer Screening
News | Colonoscopy Systems | April 15, 2019
Check-Cap Ltd. has initiated its U.S. pilot study of the C-Scan system for prevention of colorectal cancer through...
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Implements Change Healthcare Enterprise Imaging
News | Enterprise Imaging | April 15, 2019
Change Healthcare successfully implemented its Radiology PACS (picture archiving and communication system), Image...
At RSNA 2018, Stratasys showed how 3-D printed models can help plan surgeries and assist in making complex diagnoses.

At RSNA 2018, Stratasys showed how 3-D printed models can help plan surgeries and assist in making complex diagnoses.

Feature | Enterprise Imaging | April 11, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
The central premise behind en...
Photo courtesy of US Electronics

Photo courtesy of US Electronics

Feature | Flat Panel Displays | April 11, 2019 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
The flat panel display market shows signs of maturing, however many new applications are available that can help to s
Example of full-dose, 10 percent low-dose and algorithm-enhanced low-dose. Image courtesy of Enhao Gong, Ph.D.

Example of full-dose, 10 percent low-dose and algorithm-enhanced low-dose. Image courtesy of Enhao Gong, Ph.D.

Feature | Contrast Media Injectors | April 11, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
One of the most controversial issues in radiology in recent years has been the use of...