News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 20, 2018

Konica Minolta Brings Motion to X-ray With Dynamic Digital Radiography

DDR technology rapidly captures sequential radiographs in a single exam to observe the dynamic interaction of anatomical structures

Konica Minolta Brings Motion to X-ray With Dynamic Digital Radiography

November 20, 2018 – Konica Minolta Healthcare is bringing digital radiography (DR) to life with the ability to visualize movement using conventional X-ray. Known as Dynamic Digital Radiography (DDR) or X-ray in Motion, this new modality captures movement in a single exam and allows the clinician to observe the dynamic interaction of anatomical structures, such as soft tissue and bone, with physiological changes over time. The value of DDR in thoracic imaging is promising, according to the company, allowing clinicians to observe chest wall, heart and lung motion during respiration. DDR goes beyond pulmonary function; Konica Minolta is exploring its use in orthopedic applications of the spine and extremities.

This new capability will be showcased at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

DDR is an enhanced version of a standard DR system that rapidly acquires up to 15 sequential radiographs per second for up to 20 seconds of physiological movement, resulting in 300 X-ray images with a dose equivalent to about two standard X-rays. Since the DDR system also performs all conventional X-ray studies as well as motion radiographic studies, it is a cost-effective solution that provides greater diagnostic capability in an economical package.

In the U.S., 74 percent of all radiologic studies are radiography1 and nearly 44 percent of hospital-based X-ray imaging exams are thoracic2. While access to computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine may be limited in regions throughout the world, X-ray is an essential primary diagnostic tool that is widely available in developed nations at a fraction of the cost. There are also potential cost savings for healthcare systems globally by reducing the need for more advanced, and more expensive, imaging techniques.

Dynamic Digital Radiography is not U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared in the U.S.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

 

References

1. Herrmann TL, Fauber TL, Gill J, et al. Best practices in digital radiography. Radiol Technol. 2012 Sep-Oct;84(1):83-9.

2 IMV Market Research, 2017 X-ray/DR/CR Market Outlook, Sept. 2017.

Related Content

In the light of the coronavirus outbreak, MILabs has enhanced its line of high-performance CT scanners to even better detect the disease #COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 27, 2020
March 27, 2020 — Based on recent scientific research, diagnostic X-ray...
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Typical CT imaging features for COVID-19. Unenhanced, thin-section axial images of the lungs in a 52-year-old man with a positive RT-PCR (A-D) show bilateral, multifocal rounded (asterisks) and peripheral GGO (arrows) with superimposed interlobular septal thickening and visible intralobular lines (“crazy-paving”). Routine screening CT for diagnosis or exclusion of COVID-19 is currently not recommended by most professional organizations or the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Image courtesy of RSNA

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 26, 2020
March 26, 2020 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2
News | Artificial Intelligence | March 24, 2020
March 24, 2020 — Qure.ai, a leading healthcare...
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Representative examples of the attention heatmaps generated using Grad-CAM method for (a) COVID-19, (b) CAP, and (c) Non-Pneumonia. The heatmaps are standard Jet colormap and overlapped on the original image, the red color highlights the activation region associated with the predicted class. COVID-19 = coronavirus disease 2019, CAP = community acquired pneumonia. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 20, 2020
March 20, 2020 — An arti...
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Series CT scans in 35-year-old woman with COVID-19 pneumonia. (a) Scan obtained on illness days 1 showed multiple pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) mainly in right lower lobe. (b) Scan obtained on illness days 5 showed increased extent of GGO and early consolidation. (c) Scan obtained on illness days 11 showed multiple consolidation with almost the same extent. (d) Scan obtained on illness days 15 showed a mixed pattern with a slightly smaller extent, and the perilobular consolidation might suggest the presence of organizing pneumonia. The patient was discharged on illness days 17. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 20, 2020
March 20, 2020 — In a new study pub
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SBI20

Image courtesy of Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 17, 2020
March 17, 2020 — The journal Radiology ...
The low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) scans used in lung cancer screening do not appear to damage human DNA

Immunofluorescent staining performed to depict γ-H2AX foci. Representative images of γ-H2AX foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes in an 82-year-old woman who underwent standard-dose CT. (a) Nuclear DNA of four lymphocytes. (b) γ-H2AX foci (arrows). (c) Markers of DNA double-strand breaks. In this merged image, DNA is blue and γ-H2AX foci are red (arrows show small foci). γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, is a phosphorylated type of histone H2AX. Scale bar: 5 mm. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

News | Lung Cancer | March 11, 2020
March 11, 2020 — The low-dose chest computed tomog...