News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 20, 2018

Konica Minolta Brings Motion to X-ray With Dynamic Digital Radiography

DDR technology rapidly captures sequential radiographs in a single exam to observe the dynamic interaction of anatomical structures

Konica Minolta Brings Motion to X-ray With Dynamic Digital Radiography

November 20, 2018 – Konica Minolta Healthcare is bringing digital radiography (DR) to life with the ability to visualize movement using conventional X-ray. Known as Dynamic Digital Radiography (DDR) or X-ray in Motion, this new modality captures movement in a single exam and allows the clinician to observe the dynamic interaction of anatomical structures, such as soft tissue and bone, with physiological changes over time. The value of DDR in thoracic imaging is promising, according to the company, allowing clinicians to observe chest wall, heart and lung motion during respiration. DDR goes beyond pulmonary function; Konica Minolta is exploring its use in orthopedic applications of the spine and extremities.

This new capability will be showcased at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

DDR is an enhanced version of a standard DR system that rapidly acquires up to 15 sequential radiographs per second for up to 20 seconds of physiological movement, resulting in 300 X-ray images with a dose equivalent to about two standard X-rays. Since the DDR system also performs all conventional X-ray studies as well as motion radiographic studies, it is a cost-effective solution that provides greater diagnostic capability in an economical package.

In the U.S., 74 percent of all radiologic studies are radiography1 and nearly 44 percent of hospital-based X-ray imaging exams are thoracic2. While access to computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine may be limited in regions throughout the world, X-ray is an essential primary diagnostic tool that is widely available in developed nations at a fraction of the cost. There are also potential cost savings for healthcare systems globally by reducing the need for more advanced, and more expensive, imaging techniques.

Dynamic Digital Radiography is not U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared in the U.S.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

 

References

1. Herrmann TL, Fauber TL, Gill J, et al. Best practices in digital radiography. Radiol Technol. 2012 Sep-Oct;84(1):83-9.

2 IMV Market Research, 2017 X-ray/DR/CR Market Outlook, Sept. 2017.

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