Technology | Patient Engagement | May 14, 2019

Icon Launches New Clinical Trial Patient Engagement Platform

Platform designed to increase visibility of potential study participants to sites and sponsors

Icon Launches New Clinical Trial Patient Engagement Platform

May 14, 2019 — Icon plc announced the release of its web-based clinical trial patient engagement platform, to provide patients with study-specific information and connectivity with the nearest investigative site. The solution supplements patient recruitment outreach by sites and increases visibility of potential study participants for sponsors and sites.

Patient recruitment specialists work with sponsors to develop outreach programs that incorporate the right mix of digital channels, traditional methods and patient advocacy partnerships to attract patients to a study-branded website hosted on the platform. An easy-to-navigate, user-friendly interface guides the patient to new and ongoing studies in their particular indication, and a pre-qualification questionnaire helps to determine if the study is a right fit for them. If the patient decides to register interest, they are given the option to select their nearest investigative site. This establishes connection with the site, and the patient can then choose to contact the site or ask to be contacted for pre-screening.

By being able to access the mobile-optimized website at home, patients are able to discuss the possibility of trial participation as a clinical care option with their family and caregivers. Making it easier for the patient to register interest will increase access to potential patients for sponsors, according to Icon. The platform will also enable site staff to see the number of pre-qualification questionnaires completed in near real-time to monitor and report on progress to sponsors.

For more information: www.iconplc.com

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