Technology | Ultrasound Women's Health | July 11, 2018

Hologic Announces Availability of Viera Portable Breast Ultrasound System

Handheld device delivers high-quality imaging to perform guided interventional procedures

Hologic Announces Availability of Viera Portable Breast Ultrasound System

July 11, 2018 — Hologic’s new Viera portable breast ultrasound system is now available for purchase in the United States and Europe. Delivering what the company calls exceptional image quality at the point of care, the Viera wireless ultrasound scanner provides physicians with the opportunity for earlier diagnoses and an optimized clinical workflow.

Thanks to its portability, the system offers an efficient way to perform guided interventional procedures, like biopsies, marker placements and wire localizations anywhere, anytime. According to Hologic, Viera portable breast ultrasound allows radiologists to confidently guide greater than 90 percent of interventional breast procedures.1

The handheld device delivers high-resolution images directly to a smart device, at the point of care, enabling optimization of clinical workflow and patient pathway. The system seamlessly transmits breast images to smart devices and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) in the office, exam room or surgical suite. It allows facilities to add interventional breast ultrasound services for a fraction of the cost of larger, mid-tier cart systems. The device is U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared and CE marked.

Other features of the Viera breast ultrasound system include:

  • Optimization with preset modes for breast, dense breast and interventional procedures that simplify workflow;
  • On-demand high-resolution images – 14 MHz, 192 elements, and supports B, color and Doppler modes; and
  • Ideal for quick diagnostic looks, visual confirmations, interventional procedures.

"I think of the Viera system as a ‘stethoscope for breast surgeons’ which can easily be transported from office to bedside to OR, facilitating surgical planning and tumor excision," said Barry Rosen, M.D., breast surgeon at Advanced Surgical Care of Northern Illinois.

For more information: www.hologic.com

 

Reference

[1] Based on a systematic review of 29 sequentially collected ultrasound studies by 8 MQSA qualified interpreting breast radiologists. Data on file. CSR-00101

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