News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 03, 2018

HeartFlow Announces New Commercial Coverage With UnitedHealthcare

Decision by largest U.S. insurance provider means HeartFlow Analysis now covered for more than 75 percent of Americans

HeartFlow Announces New Commercial Coverage With UnitedHealthcare

July 3, 2018 — HeartFlow Inc. announced that UnitedHealthcare now covers the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, extending access to their 45 million beneficiaries. With this new coverage, more than 235 million people in the United States now have access to the HeartFlow Analysis.

The non-invasive technology uses a coronary computed tomography angiogram (CTA) to create a personalized 3-D model of the heart and simulate blood flow in order to help clinicians diagnose and treat people with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD).

In a new coverage decision, UnitedHealthcare also chose to adopt the medical policy for coronary CTA from eviCore, an evidence-based specialty benefits management company. The policy allows for the use of a coronary CTA as a first-line test for symptomatic individuals, removing the need for a standard stress test prior to conducting a coronary CTA. In addition, the HeartFlow Analysis is now approved to further assess coronary disease seen on a coronary CTA that is of uncertain physiological significance.

CAD affects 16.8 million Americans and develops when the coronary arteries narrow, reducing blood flow to the heart and potentially causing chest pain (angina), heart attack (myocardial infarction) and death.

Clinicians diagnosing someone with suspected CAD want to know as definitively as possible if the individual has a significant blockage in their coronary arteries. They also want to know the impact of that blockage on blood flow so they can best determine which treatment pathway is appropriate (e.g., medical management, stenting or coronary artery bypass grafting).

Data from a patient’s non-invasive coronary CTA are securely uploaded from the hospital’s system to the cloud. HeartFlow leverages deep learning to create a personalized, digital 3-D model of the patient’s coronary arteries. The HeartFlow Analysis then uses powerful computer algorithms to solve millions of complex equations to simulate blood flow and assess the impact of blockages on coronary blood flow. The service is provided via a secure online interface to offer actionable information to enable clinicians to determine the optimal course of treatment.

For more information: www.heartflow.com

Related Content

From business intelligence to clinical research to product development we are learning to leverage data as a critical component of how we perform and how we improve

Getty Images

Feature | Information Technology | March 05, 2021 | By Jef Williams
CT imaging radiation dose tracking software from Imalogix displayed at RSNA 2019.

CT imaging radiation dose tracking software from Imalogix displayed at RSNA 2019. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Radiation Dose Management | March 04, 2021 | By Dave Fornell
More than a decade ago, there was an alarming, rapid rise in ionizing radiation exposure in the U.S.
Detroit-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology company SpinTech, Inc. has acquired medical-imaging research and technology developer Magnetic Resonance Innovations, Inc. (MR Innovations).
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 24, 2021
February 24, 2021 — Detroit-based magnetic resonance...
icobrain cva allows the quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion by reporting the volume of core and perfusion lesion by quantifying Tmax abnormality and CBF abnormality together with the mismatch volume and ratio
News | Artificial Intelligence | February 23, 2021
February 23, 2021 — icometrix, world leader in imaging...
Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in

Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in (a). The bottom row focuses on the detection of small calcifications, a key feature in DCIS. These are undetectable in (d), detected in (e), enhanced in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image at the bottom of (f), and confirmed by histopathology in the top part of (f). The scale bar [shown in (b) and (e)] is the same for all images apart from (f), which has its own scale. Red arrows in (e) and (f) indicate the microcalcifications. Image courtesy of Professor Alessandro Olivo

News | Breast Imaging | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — A new X-ray imaging scanne
Dr Sahar Saleem placing the mummy in the CT scanner

Dr. Sahar Saleem placing the mummy in the CT scanner. Image courtesy of Sahar Saleem

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — Modern medical technology is helping scholars tell a more nuanced story about the fate of an anci
Unhealthy lifestyles, various diseases, stress, and aging can all contribute to an imbalance between the production of ROS and the body's ability to reduce and eliminate them. The resulting excessive levels of ROS cause "oxidative stress".

Unhealthy lifestyles, various diseases, stress, and aging can all contribute to an imbalance between the production of ROS and the body's ability to reduce and eliminate them. The resulting excessive levels of ROS cause "oxidative stress". Graphic courtesy of National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 10, 2021
February 10, 2021 — Oxygen is essential for human life, but within the body, certain biological environmental conditi