News | July 30, 2012

GE Healthcare Offers Virtual Tour of London 2012 Olympic Village Clinic

2012, Olympics, clinic, radiology

Viewers can navigate between the technologies in use, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, X-ray, electrocardiogram (ECG), health information technology and monitoring systems.

GE Healthcare offers a virtual video tour of the London 2012 Olympic Village Polyclinic. This is the first time viewers have been able to see inside an Olympic clinic and learn more about the broad range of medical imaging technologies in use, provided by GE Healthcare.

One of the most important aspects of the games is the health and wellbeing of the more than 22, 000 competing olympic and paralympic athletes and team officials, ensuring they have access to the best possible facilities. As the official healthcare partner of the 2012 games, GE Healthcare has worked with the London Organizing Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) to ensure these facilities are in place and equipped with the latest imaging technology. During the games even the most minor ailment can have implications for an athlete’s performance, so the Olympic Village Polyclinic offers medical support and the imaging services needed to help diagnose, treat and monitor athletes.  
 
During the video experience viewers can navigate between the technologies in use, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, X-ray, electrocardiogram (ECG), information technology and monitoring systems that will supply care, early diagnosis and treatment for more than 22, 000 competing London 2012 olympic and paralympic athletes, as well as games’ attendees and team staff. 
 
Also featured in this first are officials from LOCOG explaining how the Olympic Village Polyclinic is available to offer world-class healthcare services during the games 24/7, as well as how some of the sophisticated medical equipment is put to use.
 
“People really do have to view this video experience to see how the Polyclinic will operate during the games," said Dr. Richard Budgett, LOCOG chief medical officer. "The building itself, as well as the world-class medical services we offer here, is something that we are very proud of – it’s quite remarkable. This is also a great opportunity to see how the GE Healthcare technology will be used.”
 
GE is the exclusive provider of a wide range of innovative products and services that are integral to staging a successful Olympic Games. GE works closely with host countries, cities and organizing committees to provide infrastructure solutions for Olympic venues including power, lighting, water treatment and transportation. GE also supplies local hospitals with diagnostic imaging equipment and healthcare IT solutions like ultrasound, MRI and electronic medical record technologies to help doctors treat athletes.
 
For more information: visit www.ge.com/olympicgames

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