Technology | PET-CT | October 05, 2016

GE Healthcare Discovery MI PET/CT Improves Detection of Small Lesions

Digital PET/CT system helps clinicians diagnose and stage disease earlier

GE Healthcare, Discovery MI PET/CT system, FDA clearance, RSNA 2016

October 5, 2016 — GE Healthcare announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance of its Discovery MI digital positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system and shared a series of first clinical images. Built with technology allowing significantly better small lesion detectability, Discovery MI can help clinicians in their efforts to diagnose and stage disease earlier.

The first unit was installed at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.  

Discovery MI was created to help clinicians achieve their primary goal of diagnosing and staging disease earlier and to better guide their treatment strategies. It also enables more compelling research with more novel, faster decaying tracers. A key component in delivering these desired outcomes is Discovery MI’s LightBurst Digital Detector. This detector delivers up to two times improvement in volumetric resolution, enabling small lesion detectability, and has the highest NEMA sensitivity of any time-of-flight (TOF)/PET system in the industry, according to GE.

Discovery MI may also enhance clinicians’ diagnostic service offerings in oncology and expand PET’s impact in neurology, cardiology and beyond. These expanded capabilities are enabled by the ability to increase low-yield tracer capability with protocols that reduce dose by up to 50 percent, allowing clinicians to pursue research without impacting image quality.

This system also features diagnostic CT innovations helping to deliver 100 percent better spatial resolution, with no increase in image noise with ASiR-V. And with Smart Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR), Discovery MI helps virtually eliminate streaks and shadows from metal artifacts, saving valuable time previously spent correcting images, increasing the number of successful scans for patients.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

Related Content

Rayence Demonstrates Full Digital Imaging Product Line at RSNA 2017
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | January 16, 2018
January 16, 2018 — Rayence recently showcased their entire line of new as well as enhanced digital imaging products a
Sponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | January 16, 2018
Built on an over 25-year pioneering legacy in the advanced visualization industry, Vital continues to expand on three
RSNA 2017 Celebrates Innovation in Radiology
News | Imaging | January 15, 2018
January 15, 2018 — The Radiological Society of North America’s...
Transpara Deep Learning Software Matches Experienced Radiologists in Mammogram Reading
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | January 12, 2018
Deep learning and artificial intelligence improves the efficiency and accuracy of reading mammograms, according to...
Fat Distribution in Women and Men Provides Clues to Heart Attack Risk
News | Women's Health | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – It’s not the amount of fat in your body but where it is stored that may increase your risk for hea
Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain
News | Mobile Devices | January 11, 2018
Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet,...
Emergency Radiologists See Inner Toll of Opioid Use Disorders

Rates of Imaging Positivity for IV-SUDs Complications. Image courtesy of Efren J. Flores, M.D.

News | Clinical Study | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opio
Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief from Back Pain

Lumbar spine MRI showing disc herniation and nerve root at baseline and one month after treatment

News | Interventional Radiology | January 11, 2018
The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | January 11, 2018
Mindray recently featured a new upgrade for its premium Resona 7 ultrasound system at the Radiological Society of North...
Study Finds No Evidence that Gadolinium Causes Neurologic Harm

MR images through, A, C, E, basal ganglia and, B, D, F, posterior fossa at level of dentate nucleus. Images are shown for, A, B, control group patient 4, and the, C, D, first and, E, F, last examinations performed in contrast group patient 13. Regions of interest used in quantification of signal intensity are shown as dashed lines for globus pallidus (green), thalamus (blue), dentate nucleus (yellow), and pons (red).

News | Contrast Media | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — There is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive dec
Overlay Init