Technology | Mobile C-Arms | August 17, 2016

GE Healthcare Debuts New OEC Elite MiniView Mobile C-arm

Ergonomically designed for fluid maneuverability, the system is easy to use and allows surgeons to visualize finer details during surgical imaging

GE Healthcare, OEC Elite MiniView mini C-arm

August 17, 2016 — GE Healthcare announced the release of the OEC Elite MiniView C-arm, a new imaging system designed to change the mini C-arm experience for surgeons. This product is available for patient use in the United States with 510(k) U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance, European countries with CE marking, and Japan with clearance from the Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare.

The features of this new mini C-arm focus on enhancing the user experience by minimizing positioning struggles and increasing imaging confidence to help remove frustrations and distractions in the operating room. It is designed for limb extremity surgeries suitable for ambulatory surgical centers, sports facilities, physician offices, and hospital emergency and operating rooms.

With fluidity, balance and smooth movements, the OEC Elite MiniView C-arm enables surgeons to maneuver the system single-handedly with speed and ease. Less physical force is needed to position the C-arm around patient anatomy and when maneuvering in and out of the surgical field. This mini C-arm provides natural balance that resists drift and stays in position with features including a carbon-fiber arm that is 30 percent lighter than prior models and an orbital rotational access point design that leverages gravity for more fluid movement.

To further enhance surgical procedure efficiency, GE Healthcare introduces SmartLock, a new feature on the OEC Elite MiniView C-arm. With this exclusive feature, users will no longer need to reach and manually turn multiple levers and dials to secure the C-arm position. Instead, with the simple and convenient touch of one button, SmartLock automatically locks the C-arm in place to reduce drift concerns.

“When I can move the mini C-arm into place without a struggle and without the distraction of drift, it’s easier to maintain focus on my patient,” commented Sean Rockett, M.D., an orthopedic sports medicine surgeon from Boston, MA.

Of the 206 bones in the body, more than half are in the hands and feet. Visualizing fine bony detail such as hairline fractures and trabecular patterns matters for surgeons. The OEC Elite MiniView C-arm is designed to enable greater clinical imaging confidence by providing the largest displayed image size and highest displayed resolution flat panels, according to the company. The system comes with dual 19-inch monitors, enabling surgeons to view both primary and reference images in full-size simultaneously without straining to see.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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