News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 14, 2018

Florida Hospital First in State to Adopt NeuroLogica's BodyTom Elite CT

Hospital installs portable 32-slice CT in brachytherapy suite for treatment planning

Florida Hospital First in State to Adopt NeuroLogica's BodyTom Elite CT

June 14, 2018 — NeuroLogica, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., announced that Florida Hospital in Orlando, Fla., added the BodyTom Elite computed tomography (CT) scanner to their brachytherapy suite.

The portable, 32-slice BodyTom Elite improves the patient experience, patient safety and workflow efficiency by eliminating the need to transfer patients. The scanner increases the volume the department can take on while decreasing operating room time by allowing patient repositioning to occur in the operating room (OR). Real-time imaging enhances accuracy when treating cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy treatment.

“Introducing a 32-slice CT scanner has improved our imaging quality and our post-scan reconstruction capabilities, which has helped us deliver our patients higher quality care,” said Matthew Biagioli, M.D., board certified radiation oncologist at Florida Hospital. “Looking forward, the addition of the BodyTom Elite will allow us to accommodate a higher volume of patients in our brachytherapy suite.”

The recently upgraded BodyTom Elite incorporates a new visual design, upgraded software including improved noise- and metal-artifact reduction, along with multiple hardware enhancements. The system remains a self-shielded, multi-departmental imaging solution capable of transforming any room in the hospital to an advanced imaging suite.

In brachytherapy suites, radiation oncologists treat forms of prostate, lung, breast, colorectal and gynecologic cancers by temporarily inserting radioactive sources inside tumors or surrounding areas. This process enables precise delivery of high doses in a short time. Adopting a BodyTom Elite at the head of any brachytherapy suite allows the position of an after-loading device to be verified all in one room while the patient remains unmoved. By removing the need to transfer the patient to an additional diagnostic CT suite, overall patient satisfaction and safety will be significantly improved.

For more information: www.neurologica.com

Related Content

New Lung Ambition Alliance Aims to Double Five-year Lung Cancer Survival by 2025
News | Lung Cancer | July 17, 2019
The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), Guardant Health, the Global Lung Cancer Coalition (...
Mirion Showcases Instadose2 Wireless Dual Detector Dosimeter at AAPM and AHRA
News | Radiation Dose Management | July 15, 2019
Featuring dual detectors, the Instadose2 dosimeter addresses international requirements for independent deep [Hp(10)]...
Example of an intentionally truncated CT image

Figure 1: Example of an intentionally truncated CT image. The truncation percentage was calculated as the ratio of the patient border touching the field of view to the total patient border (red/(read+blue)). Image courtesy of Qaelum.

Feature | Radiation Dose Management | July 15, 2019 | Niki Fitousi, Ph.D., and An Dedulle
One of the main benefits of a radiation dose management system is the possibility to automatically generate alerts when...
FDA Approves Bayer's Gadavist Contrast for Cardiac MRI in Adult Coronary Artery Disease Patients
Technology | Contrast Media | July 15, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Gadavist injection for use in cardiac magnetic resonance...
Graphic courtesy Pixabay

Graphic courtesy Pixabay

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | July 15, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Siemens has long focused on automation as a way to make diagnostic equipment faster and more efficient.
Routine scan of abdomen pelvis taken with the UW-Madison’s Revolution 256 CT scanner using the FDA-cleared reconstruction algorithm, called TrueFidelity.

Routine scan of abdomen pelvis taken with the UW-Madison’s Revolution 256 CT scanner using the FDA-cleared reconstruction algorithm, called TrueFidelity. UW-Madison was the first site in the U.S. to get this technology. Its use is now being integrated into UW CT protocols. Image courtesy of Timothy P. Szczykutowicz

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 12, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
When providers develop their own imaging protocols, they are wasting time and money, according to...
Mednax National Cardiac Centers of Excellence Program Highlighted at SCCT 2019
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 11, 2019
Mednax Inc. and Mednax Radiology Solutions announced that Chief Medical Officer Ricardo C. Cury, M.D., FSCCT, will...
SimonMed Imaging Implements ProFound AI for 3-D Tomosynthesis
News | Mammography | July 10, 2019
Arizona-based SimonMed Imaging announced their implementation of the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-...
Achenbach to Receive Inaugural 2019 Stephan Achenbach Pioneer Award in Cardiovascular CT
News | Cardiac Imaging | July 10, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present Stephan Achenbach, M.D., FSCCT with the inaugural...
IBA Launches Monte Carlo Patient QA for Varian Halcyon at AAPM 2019
Technology | Quality Assurance (QA) | July 10, 2019
IBA announced the launch of the latest functionality of the SciMoCa Monte Carlo Patient QA solution at the 61st annual...