News | November 07, 2011

EUROECHO Meeting Now Includes MRI, CT and Nuclear Imaging

November 7, 2011 — This year’s annual meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), is changing its name to “EUROECHO & other Imaging Modalities.”

EAE President Luigi Badano, M.D., FESC, from the University of Padua, Italy, explains, “To manage cardiac patients today we need to acquire information from all the different imaging modalities, not just echo. As an association of the ESC, the EAE’s philosophy is that we want to become more patient-oriented, rather than pure technology-oriented, so that we’re using the most appropriate technology to address individual clinical questions.”

In addition to echocardiography (ECG), he adds, the meeting will now include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and nuclear imaging.

The meeting expects to attract more than 3,000 delegates from 87 countries including cardiologists, internists, cardiac surgeons and sonographers. Seven parallel sessions will run across four days.

“The conference represents a unique opportunity for cardiovascular imagers to come together. There will be teaching sessions for those new to the field, advanced techniques for the more experienced and the latest advances will be presented in over 690 posters and abstracts. You’ll get the opportunity to interact with leading imaging experts from all over the world and try out new technology in the exhibition,” says Prof. Patrizio Lancellotti, FESC, EAE president-elect, from the University of Liège, Belgium.

The organizers hope the Eastern European location of the meeting, which is being held for the first time in Budapest, will enable cardiologists from eastern Europe to attend more easily.
 
The main themes of this year’s meeting are valvular heart disease and left ventricular function. In the sessions on valvular heart disease, delegates will learn how risk stratification using the different imaging modalities is allowing identification of asymptomatic patients who will benefit from earlier surgery. 

The role of 3-D ECG in assessing the likelihood of mitral valve repair is growing. Evaluation of left ventricular (LV) size and function was one of the earliest applications of clinical ECG. Now, the evaluation of LV systolic function with new techniques, such as 2-D speckle tracking is allowing identification of patients with subclinical LV dysfunction related to a more advanced stage of valve disease; patients with chemotherapy-induced cardiac toxicity can also be more easily identified.

The clinical imaging sessions are a new clinical track where cases will be presented and discussed. The clinical pathways sessions, back by popular demand, will provide lectures about various state-of-the-art topics; this includes contrast echocardiography, when to use transoesphageal echocardiography, congenital heart disease, and clinical application of 3-D echo.

Challenging cases will follow each session. On the final day, six international leaders in their fields will present meeting highlights.

This year a special focus is being placed on young investigators, with the intention of encouraging their attendance. “Young investigators will be the cardiologists of tomorrow so, what we really need is a way to get them hooked on research to further our field,” says Lancellotti. 

To give a boost to original research by young researchers, the conference has developed a special mentoring program. Delegates under 35 with high scoring abstracts will be given an opportunity to discuss their work with experts in their specific fields of research.  The scheme is already reaping its rewards, with 45 percent of successful abstract submissions this year coming from investigators under 35 years.

Part of the success of the EAE’s youth drive has been the creation of Club 35, an organization set up within the EAE in January 2011 to support young researchers in training. Club 35 will be holding a special session where members will give presentations on valve disease. There will also be dedicated how-to sessions with advice on writing scientific papers, case reports, and abstracts and how to submit oral presentations.

On Friday afternoon a new light-hearted aspect of the program will be ECHO at JEOPARDY. Based on the popular American quiz show format, delegates will see short clinical cases and then be able to pit their wits against the president and past presidents.

At this year’s meeting there will be a new emphasis on communication with an official congress newspaper that will be handed out free to all delegates. Chairs of selected sessions will be submitting reports that will be accessible online.

For more information: www.escardio.org

Related Content

Video Plus Brochure Helps Patients Make Lung Cancer Scan Decision

Image courtesy of the American Thoracic Society

News | Lung Cancer | April 19, 2019
A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung...
FDA Clears GE's Deep Learning Image Reconstruction Engine
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 19, 2019
GE Healthcare has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of its Deep Learning Image...
Artificial Intelligence Performs As Well As Experienced Radiologists in Detecting Prostate Cancer
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 18, 2019
University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) system to...
Ebit and DiA Imaging Analysis Partner on AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | April 16, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with the Italian healthcare IT company Ebit (Esaote Group), to offer DiA’s LVivo...
360 Photos | 360 View Photos | April 12, 2019
This 360 degree view shows staff at the ...
A smart algorithm has been trained on a neural network to recognize the appearance of breast cancer in MR images

A smart algorithm has been trained on a neural network to recognize the appearance of breast cancer in MR images. The algorithm, described at the SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium, used “Deep Learning,“ a form of machine learning, which is a type of artificial intelligence. Graphic courtesy of Sarah Eskreis-Winkler, M.D.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | April 12, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The use of smart algorithms has the potential to make healthcare more efficient.
DiA Imaging Analysis Introduces LVivo SAX Ultrasound Analysis Tool
Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | April 09, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis announced the launch of LVivo SAX, a cardiac analysis tool that helps clinicians quickly and...
SuperSonic Imagine Highlights Aixplorer Mach 30 Breast Ultrasound at SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium
News | Ultrasound Women's Health | April 03, 2019
SuperSonic Imagine will introduce the new generation of its Aixplorer Mach 30 breast ultrasound solution at the 2019...
Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
Johns Hopkins Medicine First in U.S. to Install Canon Medical's Aquilion Precision
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 26, 2019
March 26, 2019 — Johns Hopkins Medicine now has access to the first...