News | Artificial Intelligence | October 24, 2019

Enlitic Announces Strategic Partnership With Select Healthcare Solutions

Medical AI software company and U.S. cancer center operator partner to further advance early detection and characterization of various cancers with artificial intelligence

Enlitic Announces Strategic Partnership With Select Healthcare Solutions

October 24, 2019 — Artificial intelligence (AI) software developer Enlitic Inc. announced it has signed a strategic partnership with Select HealthCare Solutions, a developer, owner and operator of cancer centers across the U.S. As part of the agreement, Enlitic will receive access to Select Healthcare’s high-quality, anonymized patient data –– data that will further tune Enlitic’s predictive models for early cancer detection. In turn, Select HealthCare will receive access to Enlitic’s AI software technology and will directly contribute to the development of future Enlitic products in radiology, oncology and pathology.

Enlitic’s deep learning models have demonstrated potential for the early detection of malignancies. In an independent validation study from 2017, Enlitic's algorithm was found to detect lung nodules with 91.1 percent sensitivity at time of biopsy, operating on par with state-of-the-art computer-aided detection (CAD), but with much higher specificity. Furthermore, the algorithm was shown to detect malignancies 6 and 12 months before biopsy, and reliably caught cancerous nodules 17.5 months earlier than when a biopsy was ordered.

Enlitic’s partnership with Select HealthCare adds to Enlitic’s global partnership roster of healthcare and technology companies, including Capitol Health, a leading Australian healthcare provider; Marubeni Corp., a Japan-based global conglomerate; and Konica Minolta, a multinational technology company also based in Japan.

“Enlitic’s diagnostic AI software is crucial to improving patient care in the future and we are excited to join the company’s list of world-class partners by providing comprehensive multimodal data that will help revolutionize how cancer is detected and treated,” said Matthew Cutler, president and CEO of Select HealthCare Solutions. “We believe that our clinical experience in treating complex cancers, combined with Enlitic’s best-in-class technologies and experience in early disease detection, will ultimately help save millions of lives.”

For more information: www.enlitic.com

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