News | Artificial Intelligence | April 01, 2020

Dutch companies Offer Free Innovative COVID-19 AI Software

This new artificial intelligence (AI) tool analyses X-ray images and is intended to support healthcare specialists manage COVID-19 cases
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

CAD4COVID will generate a score between 0 and 100 indicating the extent of COVID-19 related abnormalities, display such lung abnormalities through a heatmap and quantify the percentage of the lung that is affected.

#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2 A brief article from Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, published today in Radiology, reports on the first presumptive case of COVID-19–associated acute necrotizing hemorrhagic encephalopathy.

CAD4COVID will generate a score between 0 and 100 indicating the extent of COVID-19 related abnormalities, display such lung abnormalities through a heatmap and quantify the percentage of the lung that is affected.

April 1, 2020 — Thirona and Delft Imaging launched CAD4COVID. This new artificial intelligence (AI) tool analyses X-ray images and is intended to support healthcare specialists manage COVID-19 cases. The companies have made the tool available free-of-charge in support of the crisis. Thirona and Delft Imaging are partnering with several hospitals and academic institutes worldwide to validate CAD4COVID.

Artificial Intelligence for COVID-19 Triage

Delft Imaging is specialised in tuberculosis (TB) screening and with its existing CAD4TB solution, which uses artificial intelligence to screen for TB. Over six million people have been screened in over 40 countries. Together with its sister company and AI-specialist Thirona, Delft Imaging developed a tool to help triage COVID-19 cases and indicate the affected lung tissue. CAD4COVID builds on the technical core of the CAD4TB software, developed and distributed by Thirona and Delft Imaging respectively. This software is used by Ministries of Health and tuberculosis-focused institutions, many of whom are now being tasked with helping to stop the spread of COVID-19 in their respective countries.

Continuous Improvement

Preferred tools in the detection of COVID-19 are the RT-PCR test and the computed tomography (CT) scan, but in resource-constrained settings where the availability of such tools is limited and where COVID-19 is highly prevalent, X-ray can be a useful tool in the fight against COVID-19. In many countries, X-ray is currently used as a first-line triage before any further testing. Delft Imaging and Thirona have partnered with several academic institutes and hospitals in the Netherlands and abroad. These organisations will help with the development and validation of the software to support healthcare professionals in these times of crisis. The two Dutch companies aim to continuously improve the CAD4COVID software as more partners sign up.

Supporting Low-resource Settings

Guido Geerts, CEO of Delft Imaging and Thirona, about CAD4COVID: “Tuberculosis still takes the lives of 1.6 million people every year. It is incredibly challenging to tackle, especially as it is most active in low-resource settings where there is limited infrastructure. Our breadth of experience in such settings has made us very concerned about the implications that COVID-19 can have on countries where healthcare infrastructure is already under pressure. Many of the measures implemented across Europe and the United States will be difficult to replicate in Africa. How can you quarantine in a small household full of people? How do you ‘stock-up’ when you live day-to-day? We wanted to leverage our expertise and experience in artificial intelligence to support the fight against COVID-19. That is also why we decided to make CAD4COVID available free-of-charge; in order to end this pandemic, we need to have a big impact, quickly.”

For more information: www.thirona.eu, www.delft.care

Related Coronavirus Content:

VIDEO: Use of Telemedicine in Medical Imaging During COVID-19

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19

 CDRH Issues Letter to Industry on COVID-19

Qure.ai Launches Solutions to Help Tackle COVID19 

ASRT Deploys COVID-19 Resources for Educational Programs

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Deployment of Health IT in China’s Fight Against the COVID-19 Epidemic

Emerging Technologies Proving Value in Chinese Coronavirus Fight

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

Coronavirus Update from the FDA

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

CT Imaging Features of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Chest CT Findings of Patients Infected With Novel Coronavirus 2019-nCoV Pneumonia 

Find more related clinical content Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Related Content

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (#FDA) authorized marketing of #Medtronic's #GIGenius, the first device that uses #artificialintelligence (#AI) based on #machinelearning to assist #clinicians in detecting #lesions (such as #polyps or suspected tumors) in the #colon in real time during a c#olonoscopy.

The GI Genius intelligent endoscopy module works in real-time, automatically identifying and marking (with a green box) abnormalities consistent with colorectal polyps, including small flat polyps.

News | Artificial Intelligence | April 12, 2021
A 37-year-old woman developed a new, palpable left supraclavicular lymphadenopathy lump five days after her first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in the left arm. On the day of vaccination, the patient was asymptomatic. This is an example of how the vaccine can mimic cancer and swollen lymph nodes. Image used with permission of RSNA.

A 37-year-old woman developed a new, palpable left supraclavicular lymphadenopathy lump five days after her first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in the left arm. On the day of vaccination, the patient was asymptomatic. This is an example of how the vaccine can mimic cancer and swollen lymph nodes. Read more about this case study. Image used with permission of RSNA.

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 09, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
While the mass COVID-19 vaccinat
IV contrast-enhanced 2-mSv 4-mm-thick transverse and coronal (b) CT images show inflamed diverticula (arrows), segmental colonic wall thickening, and adjacent pericolic fat stranding. Image courtesy of the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

IV contrast-enhanced 2-mSv 4-mm-thick transverse and coronal (b) CT images show inflamed diverticula (arrows), segmental colonic wall thickening, and adjacent pericolic fat stranding. Image courtesy of the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 09, 2021
April 9, 2021 — According to an open-acc...
Varian announced it is collaborating with Google Cloud to build an advanced artificial intelligence (AI) based diagnostic platform to aid in the fight against cancer. Varian and Google Cloud AI embarked on a deployment journey, using Neural Architecture Search (NAS) technology via Google Cloud AI Platform, to create AI models for organ segmentation — a crucial and labor-intensive step in radiation oncology that can be a bottleneck in the cancer treatment clinical workflow.
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 08, 2021
April 8, 2021 — Varian announced it is collaborating with Google...
Brain tumors edged out by artificial intelligence: VBrain applies auto-contouring to the three most common types of brain tumors: brain metastasis, meningioma and acoustic neuroma.

Brain tumors edged out by artificial intelligence: VBrain applies auto-contouring to the three most common types of brain tumors: brain metastasis, meningioma and acoustic neuroma.

News | Artificial Intelligence | April 07, 2021
April 7, 2021 — Vysioneer, a leader in a...
Axial chest CT examination in a 54-year-old participant. A, On the axial noncontrast chest CT image, the pectoralis muscle (PM) area was segmented and measured in the section above the aortic arch. B, The subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area as the area between the PM and the skin surface on the same section was also measured and the attenuation of pixels in the SAT area was used to determine the individualized threshold for the intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). C, The IMAT within the PM was segmented

Axial chest CT examination in a 54-year-old participant. A, On the axial noncontrast chest CT image, the pectoralis muscle (PM) area was segmented and measured in the section above the aortic arch. B, The subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area as the area between the PM and the skin surface on the same section was also measured and the attenuation of pixels in the SAT area was used to determine the individualized threshold for the intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). C, The IMAT within the PM was segmented as the areas with Hounsfield units below this threshold for the IMAT (arrowheads). Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 07, 2021
April 7, 2021 — Body composition information derived from routine chest...
Ultrasound is an invaluable diagnostic tool for the early detection of breast cancer, but the classification of lesions is sometimes challenging and time consuming. Could artificial intelligence hold the answer to solving these problems? Graphic courtesy of Chinese Medical Journal

Ultrasound is an invaluable diagnostic tool for the early detection of breast cancer, but the classification of lesions is sometimes challenging and time consuming. Could artificial intelligence hold the answer to solving these problems? Graphic courtesy of Chinese Medical Journal

News | Artificial Intelligence | April 06, 2021
April 6, 2021 — In 2020, the International Agency for Research on...
Nano-X Imaging Ltd (Nanox), an innovative medical imaging technology company, announced that its single-source Nanox.ARC digital x-ray technology has received 510(k) clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration.
News | X-Ray | April 02, 2021
April 2, 2021 — Nano-X Imaging Ltd.