News | Biopsy Systems | March 29, 2019

Dune Medical Launches First-in-Man Trial for Smart Biopsy Device

Device provides real-time tissue characterization for improved diagnosis and read-out

March 29, 2019 — Dune Medical Devices has just completed the first in-man cases for Smart Biopsy, its percutaneous soft tissue biopsy device which leverages the real-time tissue characterization capability of its radiofrequency (RF) spectroscopy technology.

These first in-man cases were completed by Noemi Weissenberg, M.D., radiologist, at the Meir Medical Center in Kfar Saba, Israel. Utilizing miniaturized sensors located on a core needle, Smart Biopsy generated, in real time, electrical parameters of the sampled tissue. These electrical parameters will be compared to histopathologic findings in order to provide additional value with regard to improving diagnosis and read-out.

The Smart Biopsy device represents a significant breakthrough in Dune Medical’s quest to offer real-time, multi-cancer, diagnostic and treatment applications, according to the company. Dune Medical’s RF Spectroscopy and its miniaturized sensor technology provide an accurate interpretation of electrical parameters which correlate to tissue type, and most importantly, to the differentiation between cancer and healthy tissue. Identifying tissue properties during the biopsy procedure enables the physician to enhance their diagnostic capability beyond just image guidance, potentially preventing patients the anxiety of an underdiagnosis or an overdiagnosis.

The development of the Smart Biopsy Device was supported by the European Union Horizon 2020 research grant that Dune Medical received in 2016.

For more information: www.dunemedical.com

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