News | June 29, 2009

Diagnostic Imaging Associated with Improved Health Outcomes, Little or No Impact on Cost

June 29, 2009 - The Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance (MITA) commended today the release of a new study demonstrating that use of imaging services in hospitals is associated with lower patient mortality, with little or no impact on length of stay and cost.

The study, led by David Lee, Ph.D., senior director, health economics and outcome research at GE Healthcare, was presented today at the 2009 Academy Health Annual Research Meeting in Chicago, providing further evidence on the value of medical imaging technology in improving health outcomes while minimizing cost of care.

“Not only does this study help strengthen what physicians, researchers and patients have known for decades regarding the value of medical imaging in improving the way numerous diseases and conditions are diagnosed and treated, it also provides notable findings on the cost effectiveness of these technologies,” said Ilyse Schuman, managing director of MITA, a member of the Access to Medical Imaging Coalition. “As policymakers and the health care community ardently work toward improving health care quality and accessibility, MITA encourages lawmakers to consider the role medical imaging can play in both improving outcomes and controlling costs.”

The study, based on the experience of more than 1 million patients in more than 100 U.S. hospitals, found that receiving a diagnostic imaging service – including computed tomography (CT), magnetic radiology (MR), ultrasound or X-ray – during a hospital admission may be associated with decreased inpatient mortality and with a statistically insignificant impact on admission-related costs. These findings contradict common assumptions about imaging’s role in driving health care costs.

“With comprehensive health care reform as a major focus this year, it is critical for policymakers, physicians and others to look to research when assessing the value of imaging in providing high quality and cost-effective care,” said Schuman. “We believe this study serves as a valuable springboard for new research questions and continued explorations into the value of medical imaging in saving lives and keeping down costs.”

The study included all clinical conditions treated in-hospital, assessing the experience of patients with private, commercial and governmental-sponsored insurance.

MITA hopes that this early study showcasing the positive relationship between imaging and decreased mortality will help advance future research and dialogue highlighting this important association.

For more information: www.medicalimaging.org

Related Content

Houston Methodist Hospital Enters Multi-Year Technology and Research Agreement With Siemens Healthineers
News | Imaging | August 17, 2017
Houston Methodist Hospital and Siemens Healthineers have entered into a multi-year agreement to bring cutting-edge...
Carestream Launches MR Brain Perfusion and Diffusion Modules for Vue PACS
Technology | Advanced Visualization | August 16, 2017
Carestream Health recently introduced new MR (magnetic resonance) Brain Perfusion and MR Brain Diffusion modules that...
ISMRM Issues Guidelines for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Agents
News | Contrast Media | August 15, 2017
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast...
Four Blue Cross Blue Shield Companies Issue Positive Medical Policies on HeartFlow FFRct Analysis
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 09, 2017
HeartFlow Inc. announced that four Blue Cross Blue Shield companies have each issued a positive medical policy for the...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
GE Healthcare's Signa Premier MRI Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 04, 2017
GE Healthcare announced Signa Premier, a new wide bore 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, is now available...
brain with chronic traumatic injury
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017
Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative...
The American Lung Association created LUNG FORCE, a national movement to defeat lung cancer
News | Lung Cancer | August 02, 2017
To raise public awareness of lung cancer—the leading cancer killer of men and women—the American Lung Association's...
Overlay Init