News | February 09, 2012

Boston Scientific WallFlex Enteral Stents Safe, Effective in Three Clinical Registries

February 9, 2012 — Boston Scientific announced positive results from three studies of the WallFlex enteral stent systems, a family of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) used to alleviate obstructive symptoms caused by cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.  The studies, published in peer-reviewed medical journals, determined the WallFlex stents to be safe and effective for the treatment of malignant colorectal and gastroduodenal obstruction.  

The first publication appeared in the October 2011 issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and reported the short-term safety and effectiveness of the Boston Scientific WallFlex enteral colonic stent for relieving malignant colorectal obstruction.  This 447-patient study represents the largest prospective, multi-center series to date of colonic SEMS placement in both palliative and bridge-to-surgery settings. The WallFlex Enteral colonic stent was determined to be safe and effective for treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction with a clinical success rate of 90.5 percent.  The authors determined that SEMS allowed most bridge-to-surgery patients to have an elective surgical procedure without a colostomy and most incurable patients to receive minimally invasive palliation instead of surgery.

"Based on results from this study, physicians should consider SEMS as a first-line treatment option for patients with malignant colorectal obstruction," said Soren Meisner, M.D., of Bispebjerg Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark and principal author of the study.  "SEMS provide patients with a less-invasive alternative to surgery and may also improve quality of life."

The second publication, appearing in the December 2011 issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology, reports on 182 patients from the WallFlex colonic stent registries that received a WallFlex colonic stent as a bridge to surgery.  Findings show rates of 97.8 percent procedural success and 94 percent clinical success, prompting the authors to conclude that the stent is both safe and effective as a bridge-to-surgery treatment in patients with acute malignant obstruction.

The third publication were the results from the international, multi-center WallFlex duodenal stent registry and were published in the January 2012 issue of Digestive and Liver Disease.  The largest prospective study of its kind assessed the treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction in 202 patients.  Results confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the WallFlex enteral duodenal stent, which demonstrated procedural and clinical success rates of 98 and 91 percent, respectively.  The authors concluded that adoption of duodenal stenting could result in this minimally invasive procedure becoming standard of care when managing inoperable patients with advanced cancer experiencing gastric outlet obstruction.

For more information: www.bostonscientific.com

Related Content

Houston Methodist Hospital Enters Multi-Year Technology and Research Agreement With Siemens Healthineers
News | Imaging | August 17, 2017
Houston Methodist Hospital and Siemens Healthineers have entered into a multi-year agreement to bring cutting-edge...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
Virtual Phantoms Inc. Releases VirtualDose-IR
Technology | Radiation Dose Management | August 07, 2017
Virtual Phantoms Inc. announced the release of VirtualDoseIR, a tool for assessing organ dose from interventional...
Moffitt Cancer Center Enhances Patient Care with Toshiba Medical's Infinix-i 4-D
News | Interventional Radiology | August 03, 2017
Cancer patients at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., now have access to advanced diagnostic imaging for fast and...
Clinical Data Supports Use of Xoft System for Endometrial Cancer
News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 03, 2017
Researchers presented clinical data supporting use of the Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (eBx) System for the...
brain with chronic traumatic injury
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017
Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative...
NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area

NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area. Image courtesy of David Vaillancourt, Ph.D., University of Florida.

News | Neuro Imaging | July 31, 2017
Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson...
more healthcare providers and patients are choosing options such as Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery
News | Radiation Therapy | July 31, 2017
Each year, up to 650,000 people who were previously diagnosed with various forms of cancer will develop brain...
"Residual Echo" of Ancient Humans May Hold Clues to Mental Disorders

MRI data shows (left) areas of the skull preferentially affected by the amount of Neanderthal-derived DNA and (right) areas of the brain’s visual system in which Neanderthal gene variants influenced cortex folding (red) and gray matter volume (yellow). Image courtesy of Michael Gregory, M.D., NIMH Section on Integrative Neuroimaging

News | Neuro Imaging | July 26, 2017
Researchers from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have produced the first direct evidence that parts of...
New York Hospital Finds Significant Cost Savings With Toshiba’s Aquilion One CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 25, 2017
In five years, Kaleida Health’s Stroke Care Center (SCC) at the Gates Vascular Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., has realized...
Overlay Init