News | January 19, 2010

ABUS Adds Mammography to Put Mammography to the Test

U-Systems' somo-v Automated Breast Ultrasound System

January 19, 2010 - Automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS) is used as an adjunct to mammography for B-mode ultrasonic imaging of a patient’s breast when used with an automatic scanning linear array transducer. The Radiology Regional Center is recruiting participants for the national clinical research study designed to evaluate whether digital mammography in combination with the ABUS is more sensitive to detecting breast lesions when compared to mammography alone in women with dense breasts.

The initiation of this multi-center study, which intends to recruit over 20,000 women, is an important milestone for U-Systems in evaluating new approaches to improved cancer detection. Screening mammography can be limited in women with dense breasts and these women may have a higher risk of breast cancer. The device used in the study, uses ultrasound (sound waves) at a safe frequency to create images of the breast tissue. Ultrasound may demonstrate cancer not visible with mammography in women who have dense breasts.

“We are pleased to take part in this important study evaluating potential new approaches to the early detection of breast cancer in women with dense breasts, which historically have been difficult to screen,” said Mary Kay Peterson, M.D., director of Women’s Imaging at Radiology Regional Center and principal investigator for the SOMO•INSIGHT clinical study. “We strongly believe that early detection is critical and we are excited to be able to provide women in Southwest Florida with access to cutting edge technology that could potentially detect abnormalities earlier in the fight against breast cancer.”

The U-Systems somo•v Automated Breast Ultrasound System (ABUS) is currently cleared under 510(k). The device is indicated for use as an adjunct to mammography for B-mode ultrasonic imaging of a patient’s breast when used with an automatic scanning linear array transducer. The device is not intended to be used as a replacement for screening mammography.

For more information: www.u-systems.com

Related Content

Philips Introduces Technology Maximizer Program for Imaging Equipment Upgrades
Technology | Imaging | January 17, 2018
January 17, 2018 — Philips recently announced the launch of Technology Maximizer, a cross-modality program designed t
New Vascular Ultrasound Registry Looks to Enhance Patient Care
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 17, 2018
The Society for Vascular Ultrasound (SVU), the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Medstreaming-M2S announced the...
Transpara Deep Learning Software Matches Experienced Radiologists in Mammogram Reading
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | January 12, 2018
Deep learning and artificial intelligence improves the efficiency and accuracy of reading mammograms, according to...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | January 11, 2018
Mindray recently featured a new upgrade for its premium Resona 7 ultrasound system at the Radiological Society of North...
Women Prefer Getting Mammograms Every Year
News | Mammography | January 09, 2018
Women prefer to get their mammograms every year, instead of every two years, according to a new study presented at the...
Planmed Clarity 2-D Digital Mammography System Receives FDA Approval
Technology | Mammography | January 08, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an approval letter for the Planmed Clarity 2-D full-field digital...
Overweight Women May Need More Frequent Mammograms
News | Mammography | January 04, 2018
Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become...
New International Report Provides Comprehensive Guide to Imaging in Chagas Heart Disease
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 03, 2018
Chagas disease (ChD), an infectious parasitic disease transmitted primarily by triatomine insects, has become a...
About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

Feature | Breast Imaging | January 02, 2018 | Kathryn Pearson Peyton, M.D.
Sixty million women undergo regular screening mammography in the United States, but even in the digital age, it is di
Overlay Init