Feature | May 01, 2013

Texas Children's Hospital Offers PET/MRI Scanner to Better Diagnose Several Childhood Diseases

New PET/MRI scanner offers improved imaging and diagnostics with less radiation exposure

Texas Children's Hospital Offers PET/MRI Scanner to Better Diagnose Several Childhood Diseases

May 1, 2013 — Texas Children's Hospital is the first children's hospital in the United States to begin using a positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) scanner, a state-of-the-art technology that will help in early and accurate diagnosis of various cancers, heart diseases and degenerative neurological disorders. Texas Children's is also the only hospital in the Texas Medical Center to have this machine. 

PET/MRI is a hybrid imaging technology that incorporates MRI soft tissue morphological imaging and PET functional imaging. This new imaging device sequentially performs PET and MRI scans, producing more detailed images than either technique alone. Hybrid PET and MRI scans eliminate the need to move patients from one imaging unit to another, making it easier to combine data from both scans to produce enhanced details.

“To be able to study the structural and functional changes in the body may allow us to detect abnormalities, even before the clinical symptoms of a disease begin to show," said George S. Bisset III, M.D., chief of pediatric radiology at Texas Children's Hospital, professor of radiology at Baylor College of Medicine and immediate past president of the Radiological Society of North America.

According to multiple research papers written on the PET/MRI scanner, it is reasonable to expect that PET/MRI will provide new insights in the field of neuroscience and neurologic disorders, such as neurodegeneration, brain ischemia, neuro-oncology and seizures. It will also be used to diagnose many other illnesses, including head and neck tumors, many types of cancer, liver tumors, pelvic tumors, musculoskeletal tumors and heart diseases.

Until recently, scientists could not integrate PET and MRI scanners because powerful MRI magnets interfered with the imaging detectors on the PET scanner. PET/MRI may be able to replace the PET/CT scans now used to investigate cancers and other problems in pediatric patients. If so, PET/MRI scans will expose patients to significantly less radiation dose than that required for PET/CT scans.

"Radiation exposure is a source of concern for any patient, but it has to be watched with particular care in pediatric patients who are still growing and developing," said Bisset. "An opportunity to get information essential for medical care at half the radiation exposure would be particularly welcome both in pediatric patients and in adults who need multiple scans during treatment."

For more information: www.texaschildrens.org 

 

Related Content

Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of drug candidates in preclinical oncology with positron emission tomography (PET)

Getty Images

Feature | PET Imaging | September 14, 2021 | By Todd Sasser, Ph.D.
#coronavirus #COVID19 #pandemic #RSNA21 will require all attendees and exhibitors to show proof of #vaccination and wear a #mask

Getty Images

News | RSNA | August 12, 2021
August 12, 2021 — RSNA 2021 will require proof of CO...

Image courtesy of Vital Images

News | Molecular Imaging | August 02, 2021
August 2, 2021 — The global molecular imaging marke
Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (...
According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), reduced-dose CT depicts greater than 90% of lung nodules in children and young adults with cancer, identifying the presence of nodules with moderate sensitivity and high specificity.

Axial reformatted clinical (1.083 mSv) and reduced dose (0.318 mSv) CT images from a 17-year-old girl with osteosarcoma. A 2 mm left lower lobe nodule is clearly visible in the left lower lobe on the clinical CT image (arrow in A). The same nodule is vaguely apparent on the reduced-dose CT image (arrow in B), classified as present but poorly visible.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 09, 2021
How new technology can aid in reducing radiation dose levels in pediatric patients

Getty Images

Feature | Pediatric Imaging | July 02, 2021 | By David Legg
A) Ultrasound in 28-year-old woman (B) MRI in 34-year-old woman with suspected PAS disorder. Focal area of placental tissues bulge toward imaginary lines of normal uterine contour (dash lines). Length (L) and depth (D) measurements of placental bulge also demonstrated. p = placenta; b = bladder. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

A) Ultrasound in 28-year-old woman (B) MRI in 34-year-old woman with suspected PAS disorder. Focal area of placental tissues bulge toward imaginary lines of normal uterine contour (dash lines). Length (L) and depth (D) measurements of placental bulge also demonstrated. p = placenta; b = bladder. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 01, 2021
June 1, 2021 — According to an open-access Editor's Choice article in ARRS' ...
According to an open-access article in ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), increased axillary lymph node or ipsilateral deltoid uptake is occasionally observed on FDG or 11C-choline PET performed after Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccination

(A) 57-year-old woman with right upper arm melanoma who received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech) in the left deltoid 15 days prior to FDG PET/CT. FDG uptake is observed within left axillary lymph nodes (arrow, SUVmax = 9.3).

(B) 62-year-old man with metastatic prostate carcinoma who received the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech) in the right deltoid 7 days prior to 11C-choline PET/CT. 11C-choline uptake is observed within right axillary lymph nodes (arrows, SUVmax = 3.1) as well as the right deltoid muscle (circle, SUVmax = 1.7).

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 19, 2021
team of researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health has developed a new ultrasound technique to monitor the placenta for impaired fetal blood flow early in pregnancy.

Getty Images

News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 18, 2021
May 18, 2021 — A team of researchers funded by the National Institutes o...