Feature | Breast Imaging | October 04, 2017 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane

The Advancement of ABUS Technology

This article originally ran as an introduction to the ABUS comparison chart in the October 2017 issue. The chart can be viewed here.

The Siemens Acuson

The Siemens Acuson

GE Invenia ABUS

GE Invenia ABUS

Hitachi Sofia With Arietta 70

Hitachi Sofia With Arietta 70

The SonoCiné automated whole breast ultrasound (AWBUS)

The SonoCiné automated whole breast ultrasound (AWBUS)

 

 

According to a new Market Study Report,1 the automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS) market will see a 21 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2017-2024, driven by rising incidence of breast cancer and volume scanner segment dominating this growth.

The report states that the global automated breast ultrasound system market will exceed $2 billion by 2024 as growing awareness through various programs and favorable government initiatives fuel this industry growth. It cites that ABUS held more than 45 percent of industry share in 2015, increasing product penetration thanks to its improved diagnostic capabilities that will stimulate industry demand. The U.S. market led the regional industry, due in part to an increased prevalence and adoption of advanced breast screening technologies. The report predicts that favorable government initiatives, reimbursement scenarios and the presence of leading market players will stimulate automated breast ultrasound system market growth.

The introduction of advanced technologies has made it possible to detect small cancer tumors as well as improve dense breast tissue scanning, and much of this technology has gained popularity due to its noninvasive, radiation-free and 3-D imaging features for breast cancer diagnosis. According to a new research report by Global Market Insights Inc.,2 this will help drive ABUS market growth.

New technologies are being introduced by some of the industry’s key players.

 

GE Invenia ABUS

GE Healthcare introduced its ABUS system, Invenia, back in 2013 at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. The system can conduct a whole-breast 3-D examination in 15 minutes, capturing thousands of images to provide a comprehensive view of the breast. Images are presented in the coronal view by default, but the more traditional views can be accessed with a single click. The company released a software update in March designed to improve image quality by enhancing tissue penetration, which reduces shadowing on the image.

 

Hitachi Sofia With Arietta 70

Hitachi Aloka became the exclusive distributor of iVu Imaging’s Sofia automated whole breast ultrasound scanner in 2014. The system can perform a whole-breast scan in 30 seconds, acquiring 900 images in a single sweep thanks to radial scan capabilities and an extra-long linear probe. Unlike other breast ultrasound systems, Sofia performs exams in the prone position.

In September 2016, Hitachi announced that the Sofia whole-breast imaging technology would be integrated with its own Arietta 60 and 70 ultrasound systems. The Arietta platform and its long linear transducer enable the system to automate the 3-D radial acquisition of an entire breast in nearly half the time of previous-generation ultrasound systems.

 

Siemens Acuson S2000 ABVS Ultrasound System Helx Evolution

The Acuson S2000 automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) system combines the power of 2-D/3-D ultrasound and advanced technologies, such as ultrasound elastography and multimodality review, with automated acquisition and intelligent workflow solutions to create one comprehensive package for breast ultrasound. According to the Global Markets Insights report, automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) is identified to be fastest growing segment, and is projected to exceed $700 million by 2024. The combination of ABVS with mammography allows both detection and evaluation of the breast cancers, accelerating the automated breast ultrasound system market growth over future years.

 

SonoCiné

The SonoCiné automated whole breast ultrasound (AWBUS) provides a consistent, repeatable scan of the whole breast, including the axilla. It connects to any ultrasound, taking advantage of the latest imaging technology. It is comfortable for the patient, requiring no compression.

In 2016, the company released 3-D whole breast multiplanar reconstruction software to improve early detection of breast cancer. This software package augments existing SonoCiné technology for high-resolution transverse imaging. The package offers viewing in three dimensions and it maintains the high-resolution transverse view, while adding the coronal and sagittal views.

 

Automated Breast Ultrasound Systems Comparison Chart

This article originally ran as an introduction to the ABUS comparison chart in the October 2017 issue. The chart can be viewed here. It will require a login, but it is free and only takes a minute to fill in the form.

 

References:

1.     “Automated Breast Ultrasound System Market will see 21% CAGR During 2017-2024 Dominated by Volume Scanners.” www.abnewswire.com/pressreleases/automated-breast-ultrasound-system-market-will-see-21-cagr-during-20172024-dominated-by-volume-scanners_131360.html. Accessed Sept. 19, 2017.

2.     “Industry Analysis For The Automated Breast Ultrasound Market.” www.gminsights.com/industry-analysis/automated-breast-ultrasound-market. Accessed Sept. 19, 2017.

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