News | March 11, 2008

Wireless Tracking System Designed to Help Prevent Equipment Malfunctions

March 12, 2008 – Philips has developed a repair and tracking system for mobile diagnostic imaging systems, the Philips Remote Services (PRS) for mobiles, using global positioning system (GPS) location technology, Internet data connectivity and standard voice service to diagnose and potentially repair imaging equipment remotely.

The tracking system was created to prevent equipment malfunctions and includes a combination of networking links and hardware, such as a single point access for all Philips equipment via Internet VPN, Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), or analog connectivity that enables the malfunctioning equipment to be immediately pinpointed.

Co-designed with Astral Communications, the PRS may help customers prevent revenue losses on equipment, and reduce downtime which may inconvenience patients or delay diagnosis, according to the company.

For more information: www.medical.philips.com

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