News | May 03, 2010

Wide-Bore MRI Adds Comfort, Keeps Image Quality

May 3, 2010 - Wide-bore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems are designed to meet patient demand for a more comfortable scanning experience. In particular, they accommodate patients who are usually difficult to scan, such as obese, claustrophobic, elderly or very young patients, or those who are in pain and require a larger imaging system.

GE Healthcare recently installed at Hospital Laennec, Creil, France, its new model wide-bore 1.5T MRI system, the Optima MR450w. This next generation system has a 70 cm wide bore engineered to acquire high-quality images, while providing increased patient comfort. Additionally, the system has a 50-cm field-of-view, which, compared to previous versions, can scan large anatomies with fewer scans and shortens exam times. These features may drive higher patient throughput.

Built on a fully redesigned MRI platform, the Optima MR450w offers applications that aim to improve usability. It provides the following features:

• Condition-specific features indicated for breast imaging, two-station whole-spine imaging, flexibility for MSK imaging, cardiovascular imaging, and liver assessment.

• A redesigned platform offers an optical radiofrequency system (OpTix) and a new 145-cm long magnet for uniform tissue contrast and a stronger magnetic signal.

• A removable table may minimize time between scans.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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