Webinar | Advanced Visualization| November 07, 2017

WEBINAR: Innovation and Success in 3D-inspired Development of the Business and Clinical Practice

This webinar is supported by an educational grant from Philips Healthcare

3D CT image reconstruction of the thoracic organs and the heart using Philips software.

The webinar “Innovation and Success in 3D-inspired Development of the Business and Clinical Practice,” took place Dec. 7, 2017. It is available on demand. 

Register for the archive version of this webinar

This webinar is supported by an educational grant from Philips Healthcare

 

Statement of Purpose

Development of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, led by Administrators and Physicians was developed with quality and broad application to clinical service in mind. The lab is staffed by 2 full time senior level technologists who bring their intimate understanding of cross sectional anatomy and technical knowledge of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

Since its inception the scope of work produced in the 3D Innovation Lab has grown dramatically from simple bone and vascular surface renderings to production of complex anatomical segmentation, surgical and interventional procedure planning, research and development of software upgrades, and assessment of organ and tissue physiology and function. Nearly all clinical disciplines – Cardiology, Neurology, Oncology, and Surgical Specialists – rely upon the virtual and print 3D modeling which originates in the 3D Innovation Lab.

This webinar is designed to teach participants how to plan and implement their own successful 3D Lab business, including business plan development, personnel choices, image acquisition, post-processing protocols, and clinical examples to illustrate the breadth of pathology and how 3D modeling impacts patient care.

 

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity participants will be able to:

• Describe key components for developing a business plan for a 3D Lab
• Review valuable components for successful personnel development
• Explain how to optimize CT and MRI image acquisition and develop post-processing protocols
• Discuss the approach involved with engaging buy- in from key clinical services

Intended Audience:

This activity is intended for radiologists, radiology techs, cardiologists, neurologists, oncologists and surgeons.

 

Presenters:

Dianna M.E. Bardo M.D.Dianna M.E. Bardo M.D.
Director of Body MR and Co-Director of the 3D Innovation Lab
Phoenix Children's Hospital

 

Richard Southard, M.D.Richard Southard, M.D.
Director of CT, Cardiac CT, and Co-Director of the 3D Innovation Lab
Phoenix Children’s Hospital

 

Robyn Augustyn, RT (CT)Robyn Augustyn, RT (CT)
3-D Innovation Lab Technologist
Phoenix Children’s Hospital

 

William Barta, MBAWilliam Barta, MBA
Director of Radiology Administration
Phoenix Children’s Hospital

 

Disclosure Information:

ACHL requires that the faculty participating in a CME/CE activity disclose all affiliations or other financial relationships (1) with the manufacturers of any commercial product(s) and/or provider(s) of commercial services discussed in an educational presentation and (2) with any commercial supporters of the activity. All conflicts of interest have been resolved prior to this CME/CE activity.

Dianna M.E. Bardo, M.D.
Financial Relationship: Koninklijke Philips NV: Master enterprise agreement; consultant; speakers bureau; honorarium
Discussion of off-label or experimental drug/device use: IV gadolinium for cardiac MR and MRA

Richard Southard, M.D.
Financial Relationship: Koninklijke Philips NV: Master enterprise agreement;research support; consultant; speakers bureau; honorarium
Discussion of off-label or experimental drug/device use: None

Robyn Augustyn, RT (CT)
Financial Relationship: None
Discussion of off-label or experimental drug/device use: None

William Barta, MBA
Financial Relationship: None
Discussion of off-label or experimental drug/device use: None

 

Register for the archive version of this webinar

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