News | November 25, 2013

Vendor Provides After-Market Maintenance, Support for GE MRI, CT Systems

ct systems mri remanufactured refurbished equipment rsna 2013 oxford instruments
November 25, 2013 — OiService CT and MR is a service division of Oxford Instruments that specializes in providing quality after-market GE computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) maintenance services, equipment sales and parts to healthcare practitioners in imaging centers, hospitals and private practices across the United States.
 
OiService covers support from coldheads and compressors to coils and CT X-ray tubes.  Its refurbished equipment and parts undergo a comprehensive quality inspection to meet or exceed OEM specifications, helping save a substantial amount of money without compromising quality.
 
For more information: www.oxford-instruments.com

Related Content

Chief among the myriad practical updates to minimize risks for patients and imaging personnel alike is a tiered approach for delaying both outpatient and inpatient cross-sectional interventional procedures

For procedural delays that will not adversely affect patient outcome, Fananapazir and colleagues proposed the following tiered approach for both outpatient and inpatient scenarios: urgent procedures, procedures that should be performed within 2 weeks, procedures that should be performed within 2 months, and procedures that can safely be delayed 2 or 6 months. Courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 05, 2020
June 5, 2020 — An...
Early diagnosis of cancer is one of the highest-priority problem for the healthcare system, because it is critical for overall treatment success and saving patients' lives. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) may be used to detect a malignancy in various tissues and organs. It has the advantage of providing insight into the diffusion of water molecules in body tissues without exposing patients to radiation.

DWI of the phantom with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions (b value 500 s/mm2). Image courtesy of Kristina Sergunova et al.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 02, 2020
June 2, 2020 — Early diagnosis of cancer is one of the highest-priority problem for the healthcare system, because it
AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire)

AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire).

News | Artificial Intelligence | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — GE Healthcare announced U.S.
Largest case series (n=30) to date yields high frequency (77%) of negative chest CT findings among pediatric patients (10 months-18 years) with COVID-19, while also suggesting common findings in subset of children with positive CT findings

A and B, Unenhanced chest CT scans show minimal GGOs (right lower and left upper lobes) (arrows) and no consolidation. Only two lobes were affected, and CT findings were assigned CT severity score of 2. Image courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — An investigation published open-access in the ...
United Imaging's uMR OMEGA is designed to provide greater access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the world’s first ultra-wide 75-cm bore 3T MRI.
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 27, 2020
May 27, 2020 — United Imaging's...
A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue

A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue. Image courtesy of Xiandoing Xue, UC Davis

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a...
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo. Gadolinium is contained in contrast agents given to patients undergoing medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and it has been shown in labs to become toxic when exposed to ultraviolet rays. The researchers found significantly elevated levels, particularly near water treatment plants, highlighting the need for new public policy and removal technologies as MRI become even more commonp

Samples were taken along rivers around Tokyo. Measurements of rare earth element quantities indicate a clearly elevated amount of gadolinium compared to that in natural shale. Graphics courtesy of Tokyo Metropolitan University

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan...
Examples of chest CT images of COVID-19 (+) patients and visualization of features correlated to COVID-19 positivity. For each pair of images, the left image is a CT image showing the segmented lung used as input for the CNN (convolutional neural network algorithm) model trained on CT images only, and the right image shows the heatmap of pixels that the CNN model classified as having SARS-CoV-2 infection (red indicates higher probability). (a) A 51-year-old female with fever and history of exposure to SARS-

Figure 1: Examples of chest CT images of COVID-19 (+) patients and visualization of features correlated to COVID-19 positivity. For each pair of images, the left image is a CT image showing the segmented lung used as input for the CNN (convolutional neural network algorithm) model trained on CT images only, and the right image shows the heatmap of pixels that the CNN model classified as having SARS-CoV-2 infection (red indicates higher probability). (a) A 51-year-old female with fever and history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2. The CNN model identified abnormal features in the right lower lobe (white color), whereas the two radiologists labeled this CT as negative. (b) A 52-year-old female who had a history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and presented with fever and productive cough. Bilateral peripheral ground-glass opacities (arrows) were labeled by the radiologists, and the CNN model predicted positivity based on features in matching areas. (c) A 72-year-old female with exposure history to the animal market in Wuhan presented with fever and productive cough. The segmented CT image shows ground-glass opacity in the anterior aspect of the right lung (arrow), whereas the CNN model labeled this CT as negative. (d) A 59-year-old female with cough and exposure history. The segmented CT image shows no evidence of pneumonia, and the CNN model also labeled this CT as negative.  

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 19, 2020
May 19, 2020 — Mount Sinai researchers are the first in the country to use...