News | Interventional Radiology | April 05, 2019

Uterine Fibroid Embolization Safer and as Effective as Surgical Treatment

Research shows minimally invasive UFE  is a durable treatment that results in fewer complications

Uterine Fibroid Embolization Safer and as Effective as Surgical Treatment

This image is used with permission from the paper "Three-Dimensional Quantitative Assessment of Uterine Fibroid Response after Uterine Artery Embolization Using Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging." The paper can be viewed here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2563875

April 5, 2019 — Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) effectively treats uterine fibroids with fewer post-procedure complications compared to myomectomy, according to new research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s (SIR) 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting, March 23-28 in Austin, Texas. Women who received this minimally invasive treatment also had a slightly lower need for additional treatment than those who underwent surgery.

UFE is a minimally invasive treatment for uterine fibroids that is less painful, preserves the uterus and allows women to get back to their lives sooner than surgical options. However, past research suggests U.S. women, a majority of whom will experience uterine fibroids by age 50, are largely unaware of UFE despite more than 30 years as an evidence-based treatment.

“Women have options for treating their uterine fibroids. UFE and myomectomy are procedures with similar efficacy and durability for treating fibroids, but UFE has fewer complications and shorter hospital stays,” said Jemianne Bautista-Jia, M.D., radiology resident at Kaiser Permanente and lead author of the study. “There are important factors women should consider when choosing between the procedures. These factors include risk of bleeding, possibility of infections, and recovery time.”

In the retrospective cohort study, researchers analyzed treatment outcomes of 950 uterine fibroid patients from Jan. 1, 2008 through Dec. 31, 2014. Half of the patients underwent UFE, a non-surgical treatment that eliminates the blood supply to fibroids, causing them to shrink or disappear. The other half were treated surgically through myomectomy, a procedure that removes existing fibroids.

After an average seven-year follow up, the study found that women who underwent myomectomy had a higher rate of postprocedural complications, including a 2.9 percent rate of blood transfusion, which was significantly higher than the 1.1 percent rate for those who were treated using UFE. Patients in both treatment groups demonstrated a significant increase in hemoglobin one year after the initial procedure due to reduced bleeding. The two methods were comparably effective based on the rate at which secondary interventions — including UFE, myomectomy and hysterectomy — were needed. Second interventions were completed in 8.6 percent of women who received an initial UFE compared to 9.9 percent for women who initially underwent a myomectomy.

This study also showed similar rates of miscarriage for women who underwent either UFE or myomectomy. Future research should explore the impact of all uterine-sparing fibroid procedures on pregnancy, which remains still poorly understood.

A uterine fibroid (leiomyoma) is a noncancerous tumor that occurs in the muscle cells of the uterus. These growths do not spread to other regions of the body and are typically not dangerous. While some women do not experience symptoms, others have very heavy and prolonged bleeding that can be debilitating, as well as pelvic pain and abdominal enlargement.

Treatments for uterine fibroids can range from monitoring the fibroids or administering medications to relieve the symptoms, to more invasive approaches, such as myomectomy and hysterectomy. UFE falls in the middle of the spectrum of treatment options and is performed through a tiny incision. Using real-time imaging, an interventional radiologist guides a catheter into the uterine arteries and then releases tiny particles to block the blood flow to the fibroid tumors.

For more information: www.sirweb.org

Reference

Bautista-Jia J., Chuprin A., Geisbush T., et al. Abstract 137: Comparison of uterine artery embolization and myomectomy for treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids: A long-term retrospective analysis. Presented at SIR Annual Scientific Meeting, March 23-28, 2019.

Related Content

Researchers developed a deep learning model that identifies imaging biomarkers to predict a patient’s risk for developing breast cancer

A deep learning model was developed that combined imaging and traditional risk factors.

News | Mammography | November 30, 2020
November 30, 2020 — Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospi...
Chest CT images in a 34-year-old man with fever for 4 days. Positive result of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 using a swab sample was obtained on February 8, 2020. Dates of examination are shown on images. A, Chest CT scan with magnification of lesions in coronal and sagittal planes shows a nodule with reversed halo sign in left lower lobe (box) at the early stage of the pneumonia. B, Chest CT scans in different axial planes and coro

Chest CT images in a 34-year-old man with fever for 4 days. Positive result of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 using a swab sample was obtained on February 8, 2020. Dates of examination are shown on images. A, Chest CT scan with magnification of lesions in coronal and sagittal planes shows a nodule with reversed halo sign in left lower lobe (box) at the early stage of the pneumonia. B, Chest CT scans in different axial planes and coronal reconstruction show bilateral multifocal ground-glass opacities. The nodular opacity resolved.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | November 29, 2020
November 29, 2020 — The Radiological Society of North America (...
ProFound AI for DBT offers superior clinical performance when compared to other commercially available breast AI systems
News | Breast Imaging | November 24, 2020
November 24, 2020 — iCAD reported that over 1,000 licenses have been sold as part of...
Densitas Inc., a global provider of A.I. technologies for digital mammography and breast screening, announced its partnership with Mammography Educators to offer the first artificial intelligence powered telehealth technologist training platform to support business continuity in mammography facilities.
News | Mammography | November 20, 2020
November 20, 2020 — Densitas Inc., a global provider of A.I.
Radiologists around the world will have access to a first-of-its-kind online breast density training tool designed to improve radiologists' ability to correctly identify women's breast density categories to comply with the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), thanks to a collaboration between DetectED-X and Volpara Health. 
News | Breast Density | November 19, 2020
November 19, 2020 — Radiologists around the world will have access to a first-of-its-kind online...
Reduces the complexity of reporting for screening and diagnostic MRI eams to deliver time-saving and patient safety benefits
News | MRI Breast | November 18, 2020
November 18, 2020 — ...
An interview with Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, on the effects on breast imaging in the COVID-19 era

Getty Images

Feature | Breast Imaging | November 12, 2020 | By Dave Fornell
The pandemic forced many elective procedures, including most areas of...
Images in a 55-year-old woman with a spiculated mass localized in the upper central quadrant (arrow in A, B, D, and E) of right breast detected with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus synthetic mammography (SM). Breast density was classified as category C with the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. Mass was invasive ductal carcinoma, stage I, and was estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative. A, Image from SM in craniocaudal view. B, Single

Images in a 55-year-old woman with a spiculated mass localized in the upper central quadrant (arrow in A, B, D, and E) of right breast detected with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus synthetic mammography (SM). Breast density was classified as category C with the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. Mass was invasive ductal carcinoma, stage I, and was estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative. A, Image from SM in craniocaudal view. B, Single-slice DBT image in craniocaudal view. C, Magnification of the lesion depicted in B. D, Image from SM in mediolateral oblique view. E, Single-slice DBT image in mediolateral oblique view. F, Magnification of the lesion depicted in E. Images courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Breast Imaging | November 11, 2020
November 11, 2020 — ...