News | Cardiac PACS | October 17, 2019

USF Health Expands Digisonics System With Vascular Reporting

Vascular reporting module will fully integrate with Epic EMR for full documentation in the USF Health Vascular Surgery Department

USF Health Expands Digisonics System With Vascular Reporting

October 17, 2019 — University of South Florida (USF) Health in Tampa, Fla., has enhanced their use of the Digisonics Cardiovascular Information System to include vascular reporting for improved workflow automation and efficiency.

The Digisonics vascular reporting module, which is compliant with Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) standards and guidelines, will enable the Vascular Surgery Department to quickly document velocities, flow, pressures, clinical indications, findings and general conclusions. Seamless integration with the facility’s doppler ultrasound systems will automate transmission of patient information and measurement data directly into the report, translating to improved turnaround times and accuracy by eliminating redundant data entry workflows.

User-friendly drawing tools allow clinicians to quickly modify built-in vascular diagrams which can be included on the report, depicting a comprehensive view of the patient’s anatomy and disease. Vascular images can be quickly viewed at the workstation via a slideshow mode as well as embedded directly in the report with annotation capabilities.

The Digisonics solution will be fully integrated with the facility’s Epic electronic medical record (EMR) for improved interoperability and ease of use. Clinicians will have the convenience of immediate access to the finalized formatted report (with embedded images and diagrams) and study images directly from a link in the Epic patient record, connected to WebView, Digisonics’ universal viewer application.  

As a result of expanding Digisonics for vascular, USF Health has standardized its reporting across departments for the best quality of patient care.

For more information: www.digisonics.com

Related Content

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Mobile C-Arms | July 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Moblie C-arms have seen several advances over the past de
Several drivers will contribute to the growth of the teleradiology market in terms of penetration, revenue and read volumes over the next five years

Getty Images

Feature | Teleradiology | July 08, 2020 | By Arun Gill
Last year was a record year for the global...
A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
Sponsored Content | Videos | PACS | June 29, 2020
Kevin Borden, Vice President of Product, Healthcare IT for Konica Minolta, talks about Improving Access and Aiding Wo
Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

News | Pediatric Imaging | June 29, 2020
June 29, 2020 — A type of smart magnetic r...
Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosai

Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosaic pattern with a bronchocentric distribution to the GGO (white arrow, d) involving both central and peripheral lung parenchyma with pleural effusions (black small arrow, d). image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 — In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association wit