News | November 28, 2006

Two Reusable SpO2 Pulse Oximetry Sensors Introduced by Philips

Royal Philips Electronics announced it has received 510(k) clearance and is now shipping two new adult reusable SpO2 pulse oximetry sensors for monitoring oxygen saturation. The new clip- and glove-style SpO2 sensors complement Philips’ proven line of reusable and disposable sensors, giving hospitals a choice of sensors to meet their clinical requirements.  

The new clip sensor is ideal for spot-check monitoring in low-acuity, respiratory care and other environments. It comfortably fits patients weighing more than 88 pounds (40 kilograms). In addition, the new glove-style sensor provides durability and is suitable for a wide range of patients as it can accommodate both small and large patient fingers.

“The new clip-style sensor offers our customers a wider selection of reusable sensors to better address the needs for spot checking or short-term monitoring,” said Jim Polewaczyk, senior director and general manager, medical consumables, for Philips Medical Systems. “With a broader portfolio of sensors, our customers have greater flexibility to comfortably and accurately monitor patients across the continuum of care.”

The new reusable SpO2 sensors are compatible with Philips (including Agilent and Hewlett-Packard) and other qualified monitors. In addition, all Philips sensors are compatible with Philips FAST-SpO2 algorithm technology, which allows the differentiation of artifact noise and patient signal that leads to an improved SpO2 measurement.

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