News | Interventional Radiology | September 27, 2017

Toshiba Highlights Interventional Imaging at RSNA 2017

Company will showcase solutions for a variety of complex procedures

Toshiba Highlights Interventional Imaging at RSNA 2017

September 27, 2017 — Toshiba Medical announced it will highlight several of its latest vascular and interventional imaging solutions at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago.

The Ultimax-i FPD multipurpose system maximizes clinical versatility by providing routine radiography, urology, orthopedic, G.I. pain management and routine angiography lab capabilities within a single radiographic fluoroscopy (R/F) room. The system features full-spectrum detection on a flat panel detector with corner-to-corner, 43 cm x 43 cm coverage for high-resolution imaging. This large flat panel detector, along with other dose management features, can help clinicians limit repeat radiation exposure to provide safe and efficient exams. As the industry’s only tilting C-arm multipurpose system, according to Toshiba, the Ultimax-i FPD has intuitive complete local and remote control consoles, and the ability to position the tube above or below the patient.

The Infinix-i Sky + offers clinicians flexibility to perform a wide array of procedures in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. The ceiling mounted system features a double sliding C-arm that can be positioned in more ways to help clinicians increase their coverage, speed and patient access. The Infinix-i Sky + can deliver 3-D imaging anywhere for high-quality exams with 210 degrees of anatomical coverage on both sides of the patient and a high speed 3-D rotation of 80 degrees per second. The system also includes an extensive set of automated and user-selectable dose management tools designed to help minimize X-ray exposure to patients and clinicians.

Finally, the Infinix-i 4-D CT (computed tomography) seamlessly integrates IR and CT technology into one solution, with real CT imaging available on demand. The system may help clinicians to improve visualization and workflow, and prioritize patient safety during an array of interventional procedures. Its merging of the Infinix-i angiography system with the customer’s choice of either the Aquilion One ViSION Edition CT or Aquilion Prime CT allows clinicians to efficiently plan, treat and verify in a single clinical setting. The Infinix-i 4D CT offers clinicians excellent image quality as well as the precision and flexibility needed during intervention, in addition to a suite of dose management features like Toshiba Medical’s AIDR 3-D (Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3-D) for simplified CT dose reduction and the Infinix-i’s Dose Tracking System, among many others.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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