News | April 15, 2013

Tomosynthesis Improves Detection of Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma in Patients With Increased Risk

 

April 15, 2013 — Tomosynthesis (3-D mammography) is better able to show infiltrating ductal carcinoma than 2-D mammography in women at increased risk of breast cancer, a new clinical study shows.

As part of the study, six breast imaging specialists reviewed both 2-D and 3-D mammography images of 56 cancers diagnosed in patients at intermediate or high risk of breast cancer.

"We found that 41 percent (23/56 cancers) were better seen on tomosynthesis and 4 percent (2/56) were only seen on tomosynthesis," said Sarah O'Connell, a lead author of the study. Thirty percent of cancers (17/56) were better seen on 2-D mammography but none were only seen on 2-D mammography. The remaining were rated by the breast imaging specialists as being equally visible on both 2-D and 3- imaging, she said.

"The majority of cancers seen better or only on tomosynthesis were predominantly infiltrating ductal carcinoma, which typically presents as a mass, focal asymmetry or architectural distortion," said O'Connell.

The majority of cancers seen better or only on 2-D mammography were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) which presents as calcifications, she said. "This was not surprising because tomosynthesis gives us the ability to scroll through the breast tissue in 1 mm sections, which provides us with more detail, but also may separate a cluster of calcifications, making them more difficult to identify," said O'Connell. O'Connell noted that work is being done to optimize visualization of calcifications on tomosynthesis.

The benefits of tomosynthesis are especially relevant to women at increased risk of breast cancer who have increased anxiety about breast screening and have the potential for biologically aggressive cancers, said O'Connell.

The study is part of the electronic exhibit program at the ARRS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Related Content

Lunit Unveiling AI-Based Mammography Solution at RSNA 2018
News | Mammography | November 15, 2018
Medical artificial intelligence (AI) software company Lunit will be returning to the 104th Radiological Society of...
Breast Density Advocate Nancy M. Cappello Passes Away

Nancy Cappello. Image courtesy of AreYouDense.org.

News | Breast Density | November 15, 2018 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
Imaging Technology News extends its condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Nancy M. Cappello, Ph.D., who...
Life Image and Mendel.ai Bringing Artificial Intelligence to Clinical Trial Development
News | Artificial Intelligence | November 15, 2018
Life Image and Mendel.ai announced a new strategic partnership that will facilitate the adoption and enhancement of...
Artificial Intelligence Predicts Alzheimer's Years Before Diagnosis
News | Neuro Imaging | November 14, 2018
Artificial intelligence (AI) technology improves the ability of brain imaging to predict Alzheimer’s disease, according...
Merit Medical Completes Acquisition of Cianna Medical
News | Women's Health | November 14, 2018
Disposable device manufacturer Merit Medical Systems Inc. announced the closing of a definitive merger agreement to...
The MOZART Supra Specimen Tomosynthesis System is the latest generation of 3-D imaging for breast cancer surgery.
News | Breast Imaging | November 08, 2018
KUBTEC announced the launch of a new innovation in the treatment of breast cancer. The Mozart Supra Specimen...
Feature | Breast Imaging | November 07, 2018 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Breast imaging technology has experienced major growth over the last decade or so, and a new report suggests the mark