News | Radiology Business | January 12, 2017

Study Shows Imaging Diagnostic Error Rates Up to 43 Percent

MRI imaging referrals often based on cost, not quality, leading to errors

MRI, imaging diagnostic error rates, lower back, The Spine Journal, Hospital for Special Surgery study

January 12, 2017 — A new clinical study published Dec. 20, 2016, in The Spine Journal reveals significant variability in provider quality as well as imaging diagnostic error rates considerably higher than previously reported in the literature.1

In the study, conducted by the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and funded by Spreemo Health's Quality Research Institute (QRI), a single patient was sent for a lower-back magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan at 10 different imaging centers over a three-week period. Notably, not a single diagnostic finding — out of 49 distinct findings reported — was identified by all 10 participating centers.

"Diagnostic errors are a well-known problem within the radiological community," said primary author Richard Herzog, M.D., director of spinal imaging at HSS and executive director of Spreemo Health's QRI. "This study reveals the magnitude of that issue for the first time, clearly demonstrating the importance of diagnostic quality for patients and payers."

Peter J. Moley, M.D., assistant attending physiatrist at HSS and a coauthor of the study, noted that variability in the quality of MRI interpretation could yield profoundly different treatment recommendations for the very same patient. "For this patient, recommendations could range from physical therapy to surgery, which shows inter-provider variability is not just an academic problem," said Moley. "It has real-world consequences for patients: An incorrect diagnosis can lead to misdirected therapies, complications and increased disability. This study underscores the need for better standards of diagnostic quality."

For more information: www.thespinejournalonline.com

References

1. Herzog, R., Elgort, D.R., Flanders, A.E., Moley, P.J. "Variability in diagnostic error rates of 10 MRI centers performing lumbar spine MRI examinations on the same patient within a 3-week period," The Spine Journal. Published online Nov. 17, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.spinee.2016.11.009

Related Content

Breast Tomosynthesis Increases Cancer Detection Over Digital Mammography
News | Mammography | October 23, 2019
Screening digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) results in “significantly increased CDR [cancer detection rates]” compared...
NVIDIA and King's College London Debut First Privacy-preserving Federated Learning System

Image courtesy of NVIDIA

News | Artificial Intelligence | October 23, 2019
To help advance medical research while preserving data privacy and improving patient outcomes for brain tumor...
Greater Left Ventricular Mass Increases Risk of Heart Failure
News | Cardiac Imaging | October 21, 2019
Elevated left ventricular mass, known as left-ventricular hypertrophy, is a stronger predictor of coronary artery...
The Revolution Apex intelligent computed tomography (CT) scanner

The Revolution Apex intelligent computed tomography (CT) scanner. Image courtesy of GE Healthcare.

News | RSNA | October 18, 2019
At the 2019 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2019), Dec. 1-6 in Chicago, GE Healthcare...
While electronic medical record systems have helped consolidate most patient data into one location, medical imaging IT systems has proved to be more difficult to replicate by large EMR vendors. This has made room in the market for third-party radiology IT vendors that allow easy integration with the larger EMRs like Epic and Cerner. This image shows Agfa's enterprise imaging system, leveraging its ability to be accessed anywhere with internet connection and pull images from radiology and surgery.

While electronic medical record systems have helped consolidate most patient data into one location, medical imaging IT systems has proved to be more difficult to replicate by large EMR vendors. This has made room in the market for third-party radiology information system vendors that allow easy integration with the larger EMRs like Epic and Cerner. This image shows Agfa's enterprise imaging system, leveraging its ability to be accessed anywhere with an internet connection and able to pull in images from both radiology and surgery. 

Feature | Enterprise Imaging | October 17, 2019 | Steve Holloway
October 17, 2019 — The growing influence and uptake of electronic medical records (EMRs) in healthcare has driven deb
Sectra Adds DePuy Synthes 3-D Templates to Pre-Operative Orthopedic Solution
News | Orthopedic Imaging | October 17, 2019
International medical imaging information technology (IT) and cybersecurity company Sectra is extending its pre-...
An illustration of radiology department analytics data showing GE Healthcare’s business analytics software.

An illustration of radiology department analytics data showing GE Healthcare’s business analytics software.

Feature | Radiology Business | October 17, 2019 | By April Wilson
According to IBM, the world creates 2.5 quintillion bytes of data daily.
Image courtesy of Bethesda Health

Image courtesy of Bethesda Health

Feature | Radiology Business | October 17, 2019 | By Susan DeCathelineau
Few professions have experienced the dramatic changes that radiologists have over the past few years.
Guerbet Signs Agreement With Icometrix for Exclusive Distribution of Icobrain
News | Neuro Imaging | October 16, 2019
Guerbet announced it has signed an exclusive agreement with Icometrix for the distribution in France, Italy and Brazil...
Subtle Medical Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for AI-powered SubtleMR
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | October 16, 2019
Subtle Medical announced 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market SubtleMR. SubtleMR...