News | PET-CT | June 07, 2016

Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Predicts Advanced Prostate Cancer Outcomes

Study finds NAF-PET/CT more accurately detects bone metastases while improving long-term clinical outcomes and survival

NaF-PET/CT, sodium fluoride, advanced prostate cancer, metastases, pilot study

June 7, 2016 — A recent pilot study reported in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that sodium fluoride (Na-F-18) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (NaF-PET/CT) accurately detects bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer. The study also found follow-up scans over time correlate clearly with clinical outcomes and patient survival. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2012 (the most recent year for which numbers are available) 177,489 men in the United States were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 27,244 men in the U.S. died from the disease.

Andrea B. Apolo, M.D., chief of the Bladder Cancer Section, Center for Cancer Research, at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., said, “To our knowledge, this is the first report of follow-up NaF scans of prostate cancer patients over a one-year period correlated with survival. The findings in this study provide support for the use of NaF-PET/CT in clinical practice in patients with advanced prostate cancer.”

Sixty prostate cancer patients, including 30 with and 30 without known bone metastases by conventional imaging, underwent NaF-PET/CT at baseline, six and 12 months. Positive lesions were verified on follow-up scans. Changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) and lesion number were correlated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) change, clinical impression and overall survival. Also, greater change in SUV at six and 12 months correlated with greater change in PSA.

In an exploratory analysis, paired Tc-99m-MDP bone scans (TcBS) were available in 35 patients at baseline, 19 at six months and 14 at 12 months. Malignant lesions on NaF-PET/CT were classified on TcBS as malignant only 65 percent of the time; 25 percent were indeterminate; and 10 percent were negative. In addition, 65 percent of paired scans showed more lesions on NaF-PET/CT than on TcBS. 

The study shows that NaF-PET/CT detects more bone metastases earlier than TcBS and enhances detection of new bone disease in high-risk patients.

Apolo stated, “Our study suggests that NaF-PET/CT may be a useful imaging modality in the diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of prostate cancer patients at high risk for bone metastasis. It provides a strong rationale to further the clinical development of NaF-PET/CT as a bone imaging tool in prostate cancer and other malignancies.”

For more information: www.jnm.snmjournals.org

Related Content

A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019
BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for...
RefleXion Opens New Manufacturing Facility for Biology-guided Radiotherapy Platform
News | Radiation Therapy | May 31, 2019
RefleXion Medical recently announced the opening of its new manufacturing facility at its headquarters in Hayward,...
Improved Imaging for Prostate Cancer Could Lead to More Effective Treatment

The picture shows that time series signal is extracted from a series of ultrasound frames for classification. Each patch across a number of frames inside the prostate is classified into either cancerous or normal tissue. The image at the lower right corner shows the overall result for those frames. Image courtesy of Pingkun Yan and researchers from NIH, University of British Columbia and Queens University.

News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 28, 2019
Engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are working to improve imaging methods in order to make medicine more...
Study Explores Magnetic Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agent for PET/MRI

Image courtesy of MR Solutions.

News | PET-MRI | May 23, 2019
Researchers from Bourgogne University in Dijon, France, showed that use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (...
New Phase 2B Trial Exploring Target-Specific Myocardial Ischemia Imaging Agent
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 17, 2019
Biopharmaceutical company CellPoint plans to begin patient recruitment for its Phase 2b cardiovascular imaging study in...
Blue Earth Diagnostics Expands Access to Axumin in Europe
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 13, 2019
Blue Earth Diagnostics announced expanded access to the Axumin (fluciclovine (18F)) imaging agent in Europe. The first...
Shine Medical Technologies Breaks Ground on U.S. Medical Isotope Production Facility

Image courtesy of Amen Clinics

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 10, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
Shine Medical Technologies Inc. broke ground on their first medical isotope production facility in Janesville, Wis. U.S...
A 3-D printed tungsten X-ray system collimator. 3D printed, additive manufacturing for medical imaging.

A 3-D printed tungsten X-ray system collimator. The tungsten alloy powder is printed into the form desired and is laser fused so it can be machined and finished. Previously, making collimators from Tungsten was labor intensive because it required working with sheets of the metal to create the collimator matrix. 

Feature | Medical 3-D Printing | April 29, 2019 | By Steve Jeffery
In ...
Artificial Intelligence Performs As Well As Experienced Radiologists in Detecting Prostate Cancer
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 18, 2019
University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) system to...