News | July 06, 2012

Siemens Opens Refurbished Systems Factory in Suburban Chicago

State-of-the-art Wood Dale, Ill., facility to refurbish Siemens MR, CT and MI systems

July 6, 2012 — Siemens Healthcare celebrated the grand opening of its new refurbished systems factory in Wood Dale, Ill., on June 20. The 29,190-square-foot facility, located at 855 N. Wood Dale Rd., will refurbish a broad array of previously owned Siemens medical imaging systems, including its internationally renowned portfolio of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and molecular imaging (MI) units.

The new Wood Dale factory is approximately 10,000 square feet larger than Siemens’ previous Chicago-area refurbished systems facility, which had been located in nearby Hoffman Estates since October 2003. Siemens’ Wood Dale site puts the company under the same roof as its primary refurbished systems service provider, Hegele Logistic LLC.

“Our new refurbished systems factory in Wood Dale optimizes the value stream of our processes and material flow by bringing Siemens and Hegele Logistic together in one state-of-the-art facility and elevating us to a higher performance level as we continue to provide customers with Siemens’ ecoline family of premium economical and ecologically friendly refurbished systems,” says Elisabeth Staudinger, CEO of refurbished systems, Siemens Healthcare. “The additional square footage of the Wood Dale factory also provides Siemens with ample room for expansion as we continue to grow our thriving refurbished systems business.”

The Wood Dale factory is Siemens’ only refurbished systems facility in the United States, which is one of the largest markets for pre-owned imaging systems. 

For the past 11 years, Siemens has offered a wide range of refurbished systems that includes X-ray, angiography, CT, MI, MRI and ultrasound. Known as Siemens’ ecoline systems, these economical and environmentally friendly refurbished products can reduce annual carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 20,000 tons per year, since ecoline systems boast an average material reuse rate of 98 percent. Each ecoline system undergoes Siemens’ five-step Proven Excellence refurbishment process to ensure optimal form and function.

For more information: www.siemens.com/healthcare

Related Content

Early diagnosis of cancer is one of the highest-priority problem for the healthcare system, because it is critical for overall treatment success and saving patients' lives. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) may be used to detect a malignancy in various tissues and organs. It has the advantage of providing insight into the diffusion of water molecules in body tissues without exposing patients to radiation.

DWI of the phantom with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions (b value 500 s/mm2). Image courtesy of Kristina Sergunova et al.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 02, 2020
June 2, 2020 — Early diagnosis of cancer is one of the highest-priority problem for the healthcare system, because it
Nuclear Cardiology Optimistic About Return to Pre-COVID-19 Exam Levels. An American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) member survey are confident nuclear cardiology volumes will return to pre-pandemic levels. #COVID19 #SARScov2
News | Nuclear Imaging | June 01, 2020
June 1, 2020 — While acknowledging the challenges their specialty is facing, more than two-thirds of respondents to a
AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire)

AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire).

News | Artificial Intelligence | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — GE Healthcare announced U.S.
Largest case series (n=30) to date yields high frequency (77%) of negative chest CT findings among pediatric patients (10 months-18 years) with COVID-19, while also suggesting common findings in subset of children with positive CT findings

A and B, Unenhanced chest CT scans show minimal GGOs (right lower and left upper lobes) (arrows) and no consolidation. Only two lobes were affected, and CT findings were assigned CT severity score of 2. Image courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — An investigation published open-access in the ...
United Imaging's uMR OMEGA is designed to provide greater access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the world’s first ultra-wide 75-cm bore 3T MRI.
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 27, 2020
May 27, 2020 — United Imaging's...
A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue

A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue. Image courtesy of Xiandoing Xue, UC Davis

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a...
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo. Gadolinium is contained in contrast agents given to patients undergoing medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and it has been shown in labs to become toxic when exposed to ultraviolet rays. The researchers found significantly elevated levels, particularly near water treatment plants, highlighting the need for new public policy and removal technologies as MRI become even more commonp

Samples were taken along rivers around Tokyo. Measurements of rare earth element quantities indicate a clearly elevated amount of gadolinium compared to that in natural shale. Graphics courtesy of Tokyo Metropolitan University

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan...
Examples of chest CT images of COVID-19 (+) patients and visualization of features correlated to COVID-19 positivity. For each pair of images, the left image is a CT image showing the segmented lung used as input for the CNN (convolutional neural network algorithm) model trained on CT images only, and the right image shows the heatmap of pixels that the CNN model classified as having SARS-CoV-2 infection (red indicates higher probability). (a) A 51-year-old female with fever and history of exposure to SARS-

Figure 1: Examples of chest CT images of COVID-19 (+) patients and visualization of features correlated to COVID-19 positivity. For each pair of images, the left image is a CT image showing the segmented lung used as input for the CNN (convolutional neural network algorithm) model trained on CT images only, and the right image shows the heatmap of pixels that the CNN model classified as having SARS-CoV-2 infection (red indicates higher probability). (a) A 51-year-old female with fever and history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2. The CNN model identified abnormal features in the right lower lobe (white color), whereas the two radiologists labeled this CT as negative. (b) A 52-year-old female who had a history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and presented with fever and productive cough. Bilateral peripheral ground-glass opacities (arrows) were labeled by the radiologists, and the CNN model predicted positivity based on features in matching areas. (c) A 72-year-old female with exposure history to the animal market in Wuhan presented with fever and productive cough. The segmented CT image shows ground-glass opacity in the anterior aspect of the right lung (arrow), whereas the CNN model labeled this CT as negative. (d) A 59-year-old female with cough and exposure history. The segmented CT image shows no evidence of pneumonia, and the CNN model also labeled this CT as negative.  

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 19, 2020
May 19, 2020 — Mount Sinai researchers are the first in the country to use...
Advanced imaging data exchange is now live in Colorado due to the partnership of Health Images and the Colorado Regional Health Information Organization

Getty Images

News | Radiology Business | May 18, 2020
May 18, 2020 —