Technology | Flat Panel Displays | December 08, 2015

Sectra Launches New Model of Visualization Table

Next-generation table features capacitive touch interface for easier navigation of 3-D images

Sectra Visualization Table, model f15, RSNA 2015

December 8, 2015 — Sectra launched an enhanced model of its 55-inch visualization table featuring new state-of-the-art touch technology. The next-generation table enables medical staff and students to navigate much more quickly and smoothly when working with 3-D images of actual patient cases, thereby vastly improving the feeling of interaction with the visualized data. Sectra’s solution for medical education was showcased at the 2015 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 29-Dec. 3 in Chicago.

The visualization table allows medical staff and students to gain an enhanced understanding of the body’s anatomy and functions, the variation between individuals and of more unusual diseases. The 3-D images are taken by modern computed tomography and magnetic resonance cameras. Students can simply zoom in, rotate or cut into the visualized body without using a scalpel or destroying the body.

The table is a terminal for the Sectra Education Portal, a concept for sharing patient cases, teaching content and knowledge with other universities using the Sectra Table.

The capacitive touch interface is standard in the new release of the Sectra Table, model F15, as well as being available as an upgrade to all Sectra Tables of model F14.

The visualization table was developed in cooperation between Linköping University, the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Visualiseringscenter C, and the Interactive Institute.

For more information: www.sectra.com

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