News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 11, 2015

Rush University Medical Center Selects Agfa HealthCare DR Solutions

Chicago hospital will receive three DX-D 600 units and one DX-D 300 system with full leg/full spine imaging capability and MUSICA image processing and workflow software

Agfa Healthcare, Rush University Medical Center, digital radiography solutions, DX-D 600, DX-D 300, MUSICA

DX-D 600 image courtesy of Agfa Healthcare

November 11, 2015 — Agfa HealthCare announced that it has signed an agreement with Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center to supply three DX-D 600 and one DX-D 300 digital radiography (DR) solutions over the coming year. In a very competitive decision process, Agfa HealthCare showed particular strength in full leg/full spine (FLFS) imaging with its EasyStitch technology, and in its customer-focused approach. Rush University Medical Center's previous experience with Agfa's MUSICA image processing and workflow also played a role in the decision. The contract was signed earlier this year, and implementation has been underway.

In 2016, Agfa will also install a DX-D 600 DR system in an outpatient facility that is currently under construction by the medical center.

Rush University Medical Center is a not-for-profit, 664-bed academic medical center in Chicago affiliated with Rush University. It is nationally and internationally known for many specialties of care, areas of research and its new medical hospital building, the Tower. In 2015 U.S. News & World Report ranked Rush University Medical Center sixth in the nation for orthopedics, and among the top hospitals in the country for neurology and neurosurgery, geriatrics, gynecology, urology, cancer and nephrology.

Having implemented an Agfa HealthCare DX-D DR Retrofit in 2014, the center decided to implement additional, new DR equipment. Four major suppliers were considered, and Agfa HealthCare was chosen. "After a very careful consideration of the solutions available on the market, we were pleased to select Agfa HealthCare as our supplier for our new DR equipment," said Bernard F. Peculis, MS, MBA, director, diagnostic services for Rush University Medical Center. "Their digital radiography solutions offered us leading-edge image quality among the systems we reviewed, and Agfa was flexible and creative in working with us to meet immediate and future needs."

The hospital will implement both the DX-D 600 and DX-D 300. Combining user-friendly design with excellent image quality and dose efficiency in a high-productivity direct digital X-ray room, the fully automatic DX-D 600 offers the latest in auto-positioning technology. Fully motorized and auto-positioning, it is ideal for facilities with a high patient load that are looking to streamline workflow to increase patient comfort.

The DX-D 300 with fully motorized U-arm offers a small size and floor-mounting that make it very easy and cost-effective to install, in even a limited space. Yet it can handle a broad range of X-ray studies, including supine lateral examinations. This adaptability makes it ideal for use with all patients, even those less mobile, whether they are in sitting, standing or lying positions.

Both solutions come with Agfa's next-generation MUSICA image processing. MUSICA is fully automatic, easy to use and renders detail throughout the image, independent of the exam type. In addition, the software improves workflow because there is little or no need for manual post-processing for technologists or physicians as it provides consistent, high-quality images with few retakes. The high-quality cesium iodide detector technology combined with MUSICA processing also means potential dose reduction of up to 60 percent for patients.

For more information: www.agfahealthcare.com

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