News | Oncology Diagnostics | October 16, 2019

RSNA Launches Radiology: Imaging Cancer Journal

New bimonthly online journal focuses on best clinical and translational cancer imaging studies across organ systems and modalities

RSNA Launches Radiology: Imaging Cancer Journal

October 16, 2019 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) published the first issue of its new online journal Radiology: Imaging Cancer.

The new journal, the latest of three new online journals added to RSNA’s family of publications, will cover the best clinical and translational cancer imaging studies across organ systems and modalities, including leading-edge technological developments.

“The deputy editors — Bonnie Joe, Lacey McNally, Ashok Srinivasan, Luke Wilkins — and I are excited to launch the first issue of Radiology: Imaging Cancer,” said editor Gary D. Luker, M.D., professor of radiology, biomedical engineering, microbiology and immunology, and associate chair for clinical research in the Department of Radiology at Michigan Medicine in Ann Arbor. “We are delighted that RSNA has started this journal as a new venue for scientists and physicians to disseminate and learn the latest discoveries in cancer imaging.”

Included in the first issue are:

Original Research:

The new journal welcomes manuscript submissions related to the applications of imaging across all aspects of cancer, including image processing, studies analyzing clinical data sets, and breakthroughs in interventional oncology.

The journal also seeks reviews on topics highlighting new imaging technologies and the connections between imaging and the mechanisms of cancer biology and therapy.

“We want Radiology: Imaging Cancer to become a ‘must-read’ journal for anyone working at the intersection of imaging and cancer,” Luker said. “Through the forum provided by the journal, we look forward to engaging RSNA members and a broad community of researchers and clinicians who are merging imaging and cancer to improve diagnosis, treatment and quality of life for patients with cancer.”

Radiology: Imaging Cancer is published bi-monthly and available exclusively online.

For more information: www.pubs.rsna.org/journal/imaging-cancer

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