News | Mammography | February 27, 2019

Radiologists Quickly Improve Screening Performance With 3-D Mammography

First-of-its-kind study shows new technology helpful for women regardless of breast density

Radiologists Quickly Improve Screening Performance With 3-D Mammography

February 27, 2019 — Radiologists quickly learn to read 3-D mammography more accurately than they read standard 2-D mammograms, a first-of-its-kind study by a UC Davis researcher has found.

Published in Radiology,1 the study led by Diana Miglioretti found that radiologists who interpret traditional mammograms, which are two-dimensional, required little startup time for transitioning to reading digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, with improved screening accuracy.

Researchers found radiologists recalled patients for additional testing at a lower rate on DBT than they did on 2-D mammography, without sacrificing cancer detection. A patient may be recalled if there is a suspicious finding on the screening examination that requires follow-up imaging and possibly biopsy to determine if it is cancer. Three-dimensional views taken as part of a DBT screening help the radiologist confirm that some findings on 2-D images are not cancer, and so fewer patients have to be recalled. These improvements were seen regardless of the patient’s breast density.

“We found that patients with or without dense breasts benefit from lower recall rates with 3-D mammography and there is no trade off with cancer detection,” said Miglioretti, dean’s professor of biostatistics in the UC Davis Department of Public Health Sciences. “In fact, we were surprised to find that improvements in recall rates were larger in women without dense breasts.”

The study included data from 104 radiologists from 53 facilities in five U.S. states, collected by the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) to evaluate whether radiologists experience a learning curve for 3-D mammography interpretive performance. The study is the largest of its kind and represented a broad range of radiology centers and providers. It is novel because it tracked radiologists’ performance over time as they transitioned from digital mammography to DBT.

DBT takes multiple X-ray images of each breast from many angles, which are then computer assembled into a three-dimensional image of the breast that the radiologist can scroll through. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires only eight hours of additional training for qualified radiologists to be able to interpret DBT studies. Researchers wondered if there was a learning curve associated with the interpretive performance of this new technology and if any improvements are sustained by radiologists over time.

“We found both breast imaging subspecialists and general radiologists improved their screening performance when they switched from 2-D to 3-D mammography,” said Miglioretti. “These improvements were sustained for at least two years after adoption of the new technology.”

Most women in the U.S. do not have their mammograms interpreted by a breast imaging subspecialist, nor do they have access to academic medical centers. The study evaluated radiologists with a mix of experience at both academic and nonacademic facilities. Both breast imaging subspecialists and general radiologists improved their interpretive performance quickly after adopting DBT, with lower recall rates and similar cancer detection rates as for digital mammography.

“Women who want to reduce their chances of being recalled for additional testing may want to ask for digital breast tomosynthesis at their next screening exam,” said Miglioretti.

For more information: www.pubs.rsna.org/journal/radiology

 

Reference

1. Miglioretti D.L., Abraham L., Lee C.I., et al. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Radiologist Learning Curve. Radiology, Feb. 26, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2019182305

Related Content

Black Men Less Likely to Adopt Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
News | Prostate Cancer | June 17, 2019
A new study reveals black men are less likely than white men to adopt an active surveillance strategy for their...
Warm Springs Health & Wellness Center Implements Digisonics Solution for OB Ultrasound
News | Ultrasound Women's Health | June 17, 2019
Warm Springs Health & Wellness Center in Warm Springs, Ore., has selected the Digisonics OB PACS (picture archiving...
Fujifilm Announces Nationwide Breast Health Campaign With Mobile Mammography Coach

At the center of the campaign, Fujifilm will be traveling around the U.S. with its "Aspire to Be Fearless" mobile mammography coach to provide educational opportunities for clinicians, raise awareness about the importance of screening and will be providing mammograms to the underserved population in key locations.

News | Mammography | June 14, 2019
Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. announced a nationwide awareness campaign titled ‘Aspire to Be Fearless’ focused...
Ikonopedia Showcases Risk Assessment and Resolution Manager Tools at SIIM and AHRA
News | Mammography Reporting Software | June 13, 2019
Ikonopedia will showcase its suite of structured breast reporting and Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA)...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Radiology Imaging | June 13, 2019
In an interview with itnTV, Henry Izawa, vice president, modality solutions and clinical affairs, Fujifilm Medical Sy
iCAD Introduces ProFound AI for 2D Mammography in Europe
News | Artificial Intelligence | June 13, 2019
iCAD Inc. announced the launch of ProFound AI for 2D Mammography in Europe. This software is the latest addition to...
Three Palm Software Releases WorkstationOne Version 1.8.8
Technology | Mammography Reporting Software | June 12, 2019
Three Palm Software announced the release of the 1.8.8 version of its breast imaging workstation, WorkstationOne. This...
Volpara Health Technologies to Acquire MRS Systems Inc.
News | Mammography Reporting Software | June 04, 2019
Volpara Health Technologies, Volpara Solutions' parent company, has signed a binding agreement to acquire U.S.-based...
AI Biomarker Demonstrates High Predictive Power for Lung Cancer Immunotherapy
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 31, 2019
Lunit announced an abstract presentation of its artificial intelligence (AI) precision medicine research portfolio at...
62-year-old female patient presenting for 3D screening mammogram. Location of an indeterminate low-density circumscribed mass was not clearly determined as at the skin line or just under the surface.

62-year-old female patient presenting for 3D screening mammogram. Location of an indeterminate low-density circumscribed mass was not clearly determined as at the skin line or just under the surface.

Feature | Mammography | May 31, 2019 | By Olive Peart M.S., R.T.(R)(M)
In recent years there has been a lot of debate about the role of the...