News | December 24, 2013

Q.Clear Delivers PET Quantitation, Image Quality

nuclear molecular imaging ge q.clear rsna 2013 pet systems q.suite
December 24, 2013 — GE Healthcare showcased at the Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA 2013) a work-in-progress product for positron emission tomography (PET) that quickly and confidently evaluates a patient’s response to cancer treatment. The Q.Clear tool provides up to two times improvement in both PET quantitative accuracy (SUVmean) and image quality (signal-to-noise ratio). Over the last decade, PET image reconstruction technology has been designed to provide better image quality, reduced acquisition time and lower injected dose. Current PET iterative reconstruction technologies, such as Time of Flight (TOF) and OSEM, force a compromise between image quality and quantitation. GE Healthcare’s new 510(k)-pending Q.Clear technology on shows the advantage of full convergence PET imaging without compromise between quantitation and image quality. 
“We know that cancer patients don’t always respond to their initial course of treatment,” said Steve Gray, president and CEO, molecular imaging and computed tomography (CT), GE Healthcare. “If we can give clinicians a more accurate, reliable and faster tool to confirm that a change in treatment is needed, the patient will benefit greatly. For example, PET/CT can help clinicians determine whether chemotherapy is working after as few as one to two cycles, saving patients unnecessary procedures and a significant amount of money. Q.Clear gives clinicians the ability to help make that determination.” 
Clinicians will not only benefit from the ability to detect the smallest lesions, but also the ability to determine earlier whether the metabolic activity is being mitigated under current treatment. Q.Clear aims to provide better quantitation accuracy for personalized medicine. Coupled with GE Healthcare’s Q.Suite, which introduced the importance of eliminating variability such as respiratory motion, Q.Clear will enable clinicians to assess treatment response more accurately than ever before. 
Q.Clear is U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k)-pending and is not yet CE marked. Q.Clear is not available for sale in all regions.
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