News | PET-CT | February 05, 2018

PSMA PET-CT Clearly Differentiates Prostate Cancer from Benign Tissue

Study findings could set the stage for multimodal image-guided fusion biopsy in the future

PSMA PET-CT Clearly Differentiates Prostate Cancer from Benign Tissue

68Ga-PSMA PET/CT images showing multifocal PCA in peripheral zone with GS of 5 1 5 5 10. (A and C) Axial PET images. (B and D) Fused PET/CT images. SUVmax of lesion in B was 84.3 and that of lesion in D was 5.7. IRS was 3, and 80% of cells were stained. Credit: Senior author V Prasad, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

February 5, 2018 — Using nuclear medicine, German researchers have found a way to accurately differentiate cancerous tissue from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients. The research is highlighted in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

According to the American Cancer Society, one in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. Early diagnosis is key to successful treatment.

The new study demonstrates that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA) PET/CT scans correlates with PSMA-expression in primary prostate cancer. By this means, researchers were able to generate an SUVmax cutoff for the differentiation of cancerous and benign prostate tissue.

“To the best of our knowledge, this was the first study to generate a cutoff SUVmax, validated by immunohistochemistry, for separating prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT [positron emission tomography/computed tomography] images,” explained Vikas Prasad, M.D., Ph.D., of Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin in Germany. “Our SUVmax cutoff can be used to confirm or rule out prostate cancer with a very high degree of sensitivity and specificity.”

He pointed out, “Recent years have brought tremendous advances in image-based biopsy of the prostate. However, in many patients, histopathology may not yield correct diagnosis (e.g., if the tumor is missed during true-cut biopsy). This is especially true for multifocal prostate cancer, less aggressive tumors, and cases of prostatitis or prior prostate irradiation, where MRI [magnetic resonance imaging] alone may not give the correct localization and malignancy grade.”

For the study, the data of 31 men (mean age of 67.2 years) who had undergone prostatectomies and preoperative PET scans were analyzed, with the SUVmax generated for suspicious areas and visually normal tissue. Both cancerous and benign prostate tissue samples (62 total) were stained with monoclonal anti-PSMA antibody. All the cancerous lesions could be confirmed histopathologically. The best cut-off value was determined to be 3.15 (sensitivity 97 percent, specificity 90 percent).

Prasad noted, “This validated cutoff of 3.15 for SUVmax enables the diagnosis of prostate cancer with a high sensitivity and specificity in both unifocal and multifocal disease.”

Looking ahead, he posited, “With advancement of image-registration/segmentation software and PET/MRI scanners, it is quite logical to predict that in the future PET images and SUVmax on a suspicious lesion in the prostate will be used for multimodal image-guided fusion biopsy.”

For more information: www.jnm.snmjournals.org

 

Related Content

Houston Methodist Hospital Acquires Focal One High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound System
News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | March 19, 2019
EDAP TMS SA announced that Houston Methodist Hospital, one of the first hospitals in the U.S. to offer Ablatherm...
Older Biologic Age Linked to Elevated Breast Cancer Risk
News | Women's Health | March 19, 2019
Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person’s age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according...
HeartFlow Analysis Successfully Stratifies Heart Disease Patients at One Year
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | March 19, 2019
Late-breaking results confirm the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis enables...
PET Scans Show Biomarkers Could Spare Some Breast Cancer Patients from Chemotherapy
News | PET Imaging | March 18, 2019
A new study positron emission tomography (PET) scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Non-Contrast MRI Effective in Monitoring MS Patients
News | Neuro Imaging | March 18, 2019
Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach...
Bay Labs Announces New Data on EchoGPS, AutoEF AI Software at ACC.19
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | March 15, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) company Bay Labs announced the presentation of two studies assessing performance of the...
Hologic Receives CE Mark for Three-in-One Omni Hysteroscope
News | Endoscopes | March 14, 2019
Hologic Inc. announced it has received a CE mark in Europe for its Omni hysteroscope, a three-in-one modular scope with...
Researchers Create New Method for Developing Cancer Imaging Isotopes

Prototype fluidic system for zirconium-89 purification. Image taken through a hot cell window at the Department of Radiology, University of Washington. Image courtesy of Matthew O’Hara, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 14, 2019
A team of researchers at the University of Washington announced they developed a new automated system for producing...
CT, Mammograms Offer Clues to Preventing Heart Problems After Cancer Treatment
News | Cardio-oncology | March 13, 2019
An imaging procedure commonly performed before starting cancer treatment can provide valuable clues about a patient's...