Technology | May 27, 2009

ProSolv Version 4.0.2 Makes Commercial Debut at ASE

May 26, 2009 - ProSolv Cardiovascular, a Fujifilm company, this week released its Synapse ProSolv Cardiovascular version 4.0.2 software.

It features integration with QLAB advanced quantification software from Philips Healthcare. This latest software release from ProSolv is designed to enhance clinical workflow, help improve patient care, and reduce the potential for errors by automating the exchange of data between the two systems. The product will be highlighted at the 20th Annual American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) Scientific Sessions June 6-10, in Washington, D.C.

Synapse ProSolv Cardiovascular 4.0.2 provides workflow and diagnostic benefits by bringing ready access to the advanced quantification capabilities of QLAB – including 2D and 3D ultrasound – into the echocardiographer’s everyday clinical practice. With 4.0.2, users performing image review and reporting can launch the full QLAB application directly from the image in the Synapse ProSolv cardiovascular application for greater efficiency, the company said. All exported images from QLAB are converted to DICOM format and then stored with the original study in ProSolv. Clinicians can now review the entire study, including the processed 3D images, throughout the enterprise using ProSolv’s Web capability.

For more information: www.prosolv.com

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