News | August 16, 2010

Portable Workstation Gives Radiologists Reading Flexibility

 NextComputing.travelrad

August 16, 2010 – There is a new solution for radiologists who want the flexibility to perform diagnostic reads from any location.  The NextDimension TravelRad is a compact, briefcase-sized, high-performance workstation computer and a pair of detachable, high-resolution displays that provide a turnkey portable solution for remote reading and reporting of imaging studies across several modalities. It is available from NextComputing, makers of portable and small-footprint computers.

Although the teleradiology movement has spurred a huge growth in remote imaging services, radiologists are still largely restricted to working wherever there is adequate workstation hardware for the job.  This usually means either the imaging facility or their remote or home office where a suitable picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstation is located.  Even traveling radiologists who service multiple facilities are still limited to using only the system provided to them by a facility, with no viable alternative if they need to work anywhere else.  Even high-end laptops do not offer the performance and functionality for a real teleradiology workflow.

Using feedback gathered from the teleradiology community, NextComputing has developed a portable computer solution that frees radiologists from the restrictions of stationary workstations. The NextDimension TravelRad system combines a powerful workstation and integrated monitor with two high-resolution, portrait-oriented displays for a complete PACS reading station.  The entire system can be set up and broken down in minutes and fits into a travel case.

Easy to transport and small enough to be taken on the passenger section of an airplane, the NextDimension TravelRad allows radiologists to work from anywhere there is power and an Internet connection.  It supports both industry-standard PACS viewing and voice-recognition software in one system.

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