Technology | November 30, 2011

Parascript Announces AccuDetect 5.0, Computer-Aided Detection for Digital Mammography

November 30, 2011 –– Parascript, the image analysis and pattern recognition technology provider, announced the release of AccuDetect 5.0, the next generation of its computer-aided detection (CAD) software, aimed at helping radiologists improve breast cancer detection. AccuDetect 5.0 makes significant performance improvements over its predecessor and further reduces the potential for false-positive rates when detecting suspicious lesions on mammograms.

AccuDetect is tuned to work with the leading full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and computed radiography (CR) systems. The software recently received CE Mark approval and is installed in multiple radiology centers in France, Italy, and The Netherlands. It is also used by the Russian Center for Roentgeno – Radiology Research (RNCRR), Russia's largest, most recognized breast cancer oncology center, which is based in Moscow.

Available for FFDM vendors interested in reducing false-positive rates of existing CAD systems, AccuDetect is intended to assist radiologists in the early detection of breast cancer during mammography screening exams. The technology has been developed using a broad database of digital images from leading digital mammography systems. It uses several proprietary complementary algorithms to detect the presence of suspicious lesions on mammogram images. Proprietary voting technology combines the detection results from each algorithm. The result is a state-of-the art CAD product with high sensitivity and low false-positive rates.

CAD systems are typically relied upon to identify and highlight hard-to-find anomalies on medical images. The systems enable suspicious lesions to be brought to the attention of radiologists. AccuDetect automatically identifies and clearly marks suspicious areas, enabling a more accurate interpretation of mammograms and increased detection of calcifications and masses.

For more information: www.parascript.com

 

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