News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 27, 2020

Oxford University Spin-out Begins Search for 10,000 X-rays to Help Predict Outcome for COVID-19

Platform will help medical professionals predict outcome for patients on different treatments by comparing their X-rays to previous patients with similar conditions

Zegami, the Oxford University data visualization spin-out, has announced it has written to the health ministers of ten countries asking them to provide X-rays of COVID-19 infected lungs.

April 27, 2020 — Zegami, the Oxford University data visualization spin-out, has announced it has written to the health ministers of ten countries asking them to provide X-rays of COVID-19 infected lungs. A diverse set of example images are needed in order to build a more robust machine learning model, a form of artificial intelligence, to assist health professionals identify cases of COVID-19. The use of artificial intelligence like this has the potential to provide better outcomes for patients and even lead to more effective treatments, if it can become fully operational.

To date, Zegami has access to 226 X-rays of COVID-19 infected lungs but needs around 10,000.

Zegami, which is offering its services for free in the fight against coronavirus, says its new model could not only help identify and differentiate COVID-19 cases more easily from other lung conditions such as  bacterial pneumonia and viral pneumonia, it could also help predict potential outcomes for patients by comparing their COVID-19 lung X-rays with other previous patients who had similar conditions, and what eventually happened to them based on different treatment options.

In developing its new platform, Zegami has initially used images of COVID-19 X-rays from the GitHub data initiative, which was launched by Joseph Paul Cohen, a Postdoctoral Fellow from Mila, University of Montreal.  He is looking to develop the world’s largest collection of X-ray and CT images of COVID-19 infected lungs, to enable automated diagnosis faster and more accurately. 

Roger Noble, CEO and founder of Zegami said: “The fight against COVID-19 is a global one so we have written to the health ministers of a number of countries asking if they can help us with the development of our new platform. As soon as we have enough x-rays it will be fully up and running and we hope ready to play a key role in supporting medical and technical professionals in their battle with this disease.”

Zegami launched out of Oxford University in 2016.  It is currently exploring new ideas and making new discoveries for 35 clients and counting, across an ever-growing variety of sectors.  

For more information: www.zegami.com

Related Content

Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (...
ASTRO just issued the following statement in response to the Radiation Oncology Model update in yesterday's HOPPS proposed rule, which compounds significant and detrimental cuts to the cancer care specialty in the proposed 2022 MPFS

Getty Images

News | Radiation Therapy | July 20, 2021
July 20, 2021 — In response to consecutive weeks of proposed...
ujifilm's robust medical systems portfolio includes a comprehensive product lineup covering CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, digital radiography, women’s health, ultrasound, systems integration, endoscopy and endosurgery, enterprise imaging, assisted reproductive technology, cell culture media, cell therapy development, In-Vitro diagnostics (IVD), and investigational drug development
News | Radiology Imaging | July 14, 2021
July 14, 2021 — Fujifilm announced the launch of the ...
Nearly one quarter of deaths from lung cancer could be avoided in high-risk populations through the adoption of targeted screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scans, as based on the results of the NELSON study.

Getty Images

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 11, 2021
July 11, 2021 — The report ‘Lung Cancer Screening: The Cost of Inaction’ shows that lung cancer screening pres
Annalise.ai has launched its comprehensive chest X-ray AI solution Annalise CXR, which detects 124 clinical findings and is a decision support tool for radiologists and clinicians. The company was originally formed as a joint venture between Australian healthcare technology company Harrison.ai and one of the world’s largest radiology companies, I–MED Radiology Network. 
News | X-Ray | July 07, 2021
July 7, 2021 — Annalise.ai has launched its comprehensive chest X-ray AI solution...
More complex, longer interventional procedures such as structural heart interventions or this revascularization of a coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, requires angiography imaging systems that have improved image detail and lower radiation dose. However, purchase of new systems was put on hold by many hospitals in 2020 due to the sudden drop in elective procedures and diversion of resources due to the COVID-19. Photo by Dave Fornell.

More complex, longer interventional procedures such as structural heart interventions or this revascularization of a coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, requires angiography imaging systems that have improved image detail and lower radiation dose. However, purchase of new systems was put on hold by many hospitals in 2020 due to the sudden drop in elective procedures and diversion of resources due to the COVID-19. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Mobile C-Arms | July 07, 2021 | By Bhvita Jani
With the postponement of non-essential elective surgeries and medical procedures in 2020 to conserve medical resource
The demands on radiologists have become more complex which has led to the need to have greater control over how technology supports the goals and objectives of the organization

Getty Images

Feature | Information Technology | July 06, 2021 | By Jef Williams
Due to dangerous implications for years to come, facilities must increase efficiency and capacity for breast cancer care to recover from the impact of COVID-19

Getty Images

Feature | Breast Imaging | July 06, 2021 | By Ananth Ravi, Ph.D.
The challenges
Using advanced X-ray technology, researchers have for the first time imaged an entire mouse brain, from the synapse to the whole brain level

By using an imaging pipeline of MRI, μCT, and EM, Foxley, Kasthuri, and their team were able to simultaneously resolve brain structures, like the white matter, at (a) macro-, (b) meso-, and (c) microscopic-scales in the same brain. Image from Foxley et al.

News | Neuro Imaging | July 02, 2021
July 2, 2021 — Researchers at the University of Chicago and t
In the STOIC study, readers classified CT exams as COVID positive, COVID negative or normal. The readers had access to the CT scans using a 3D image visualization web application, allowing scrolling through the entire lung volume in the coronal, sagittal or axial transverse plane. The CT scan shown here has been classified as COVID positive due to the presence of bilateral ground glass opacities and absence of features such as mucoid impaction, bronchiolar nodules, segmental, lobar consolidation. RSNA Image

In the STOIC study, readers classified CT exams as COVID positive, COVID negative or normal. The readers had access to the CT scans using a 3-D image visualization web application, allowing scrolling through the entire lung volume in the coronal, sagittal or axial transverse plane. The CT scan shown here has been classified as COVID positive due to the presence of bilateral ground glass opacities and absence of features such as mucoid impaction, bronchiolar nodules, segmental or lobar consolidation. Image courtesy of RSNA

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 01, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor