News | October 01, 2014

Opportunities to Reduce Patient Burden Associated With Breast Cancer Screening

Series of articles illustrate the need for a more tailored approach to breast cancer awareness, education and screening

Journal of Women's Health, published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women.

New technology and better screening strategies can lower the rate of false-positive results, which impose a substantial financial and psychological burden on women. The many misperceptions about breast cancer screening options and risks, the benefits and costs of screening, and the need for new approaches and better education are discussed in a series of articles in a supplement to Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The supplement is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website at http://online.liebertpub.com/toc/jwh/23/S1.

In the article "The Patient Burden of Screening Mammography Recall," the authors reported that among more than 1.7 million women aged 40-75 who underwent screening mammography and were not diagnosed with breast cancer, 15 percent were recalled for further testing. The cumulative risk of a false-positive result after 10 years of annual screening mammograms is an estimated 61 percent. Coauthors Matthew Alcusky, PharmD, Janice Clarke, RN, and Alexandria Skoufalos, EdD, Jefferson School of Population Health; Liane Philpotts, MD, FSBI, Yale University School of Medicine; and Machaon Bonafede, Ph.D., MPH, Truven Health Analytics, evaluated the direct cost burden of recall, the indirect costs associated with missed work time, travel, and substitute caregivers, for example, and the physical or psychological effects of a false-positive result, which may include unnecessary anxiety and reduced quality of life.

In an accompanying review article on "Understanding Patient Options, Utilization Patterns and Burdens Associated with Breast Cancer Screening," authors Susan C. Harvey, M.D., Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions; Sharon Mass, M.D., FACOG, Morristown Obstetrics and Gynecology Associates; and Ashok Vegesna, PharmD, Janice Clarke, RN, and Alexandria Skoufalos, EdD, Jefferson School of Population Health, attributed much of the confusion women face in making informed decisions about breast cancer screening and recall options to a lack of consensus among the organizations developing screening guidelines and the mixed messages they deliver. The authors called for a more thoughtful approach to breast cancer screening and research that takes into account the tangible and intangible costs that women now bear.

"The articles in this supplement are timely and reveal surprisingly complex issues," said Susan C. Harvey, M.D., in her editorial, "The Charge and the Challenges of Breast Cancer Screening." Collectively, the articles "illustrate the need for a more tailored approach to breast cancer awareness, education, and screening. The goal is to make appropriate screening and diagnosis easier on women and more responsive to the changing face of value-based health care."

"The direct and indirect cost burden of inconclusive mammography screenings and recalls is significant and indicates a need for new approaches to breast cancer screening," said Susan G. Kornstein, M.D., editor-in-chief of Journal of Women's Health, executive director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, Va., and president of the Academy of Women's Health.

 

Related Content

Illinois Governor Approves State Breast Density Reporting Bill Into Law
News | Breast Density | August 13, 2018
Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner approved the Illinois Breast Density Reporting Law (Public Act 100-0749) on Aug. 10, 2018...
PET Tracer Identifies Estrogen Receptor Expression Differences in Breast Cancer Patients
News | PET Imaging | August 09, 2018
In metastatic breast cancer, prognosis and treatment is largely influenced by estrogen receptor (ER) expression of the...
iCAD Receives FDA Clearance of PowerLook Density Assessment for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis
Technology | Breast Density | August 08, 2018
iCAD announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of its latest artificial intelligence (AI) software...
Cardiac Imaging Reveals Roots of Preeclampsia Damage in Pregnant Women
News | Women's Health | August 07, 2018
Johns Hopkins researchers say a heart imaging study of scores of pregnant women with the most severe and dangerous form...
Cardiac Monitoring a Higher Priority for High-Risk Breast Cancer Patients
News | Cardio-oncology | August 07, 2018
August 7, 2018 — While heart failure is an uncommon complication of...
Hologic Acquires Digital Specimen Radiography Company Faxitron Bioptics

VisionCT 3-D breast specimen-designated computed tomography (CT) system. Image courtesy of Faxitron Bioptics.

News | Breast Imaging | July 31, 2018
Hologic Inc. announced it has completed the acquisition of Faxitron Bioptics, a privately-held leader in digital...
Konica Minolta Hosting Lunch and Learn at 23rd Annual Mammography Meeting in Santa Fe
News | Breast Imaging | July 31, 2018
Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. will sponsor a lunch and learn featuring its Exa Mammo platform during the 23rd...
FDA Approves New Tomosynthesis Quality Control Tests for ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual
News | Mammography | July 30, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the American College of Radiology’s (ACR’s) amendment to...
The Magtrace and Sentimag Magnetic Localization System uses magnetic detection during sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures to identify specific lymph nodes, known as sentinel lymph nodes, for surgical removal. The FDA granted approval of the Sentimag System to Endomagnetics Inc.

The  Endomagnetics' Magtrace and Sentimag Magnetic Localization System uses magnetic detection during sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures to identify specific lymph nodes, known as sentinel lymph nodes, for surgical removal.

Technology | Women's Health | July 24, 2018
July 24, 2018 — The U.S.
Overlay Init