News | Interventional Radiology | March 25, 2019

NZ Technologies Announces First Peer-Reviewed Paper on TIPSO AirPad

Device allows wireless in-suite control of image viewing and manipulation without scrubbing out of the sterile workspace

NZ Technologies Announces First Peer-Reviewed Paper on TIPSO AirPad

March 25, 2019 — NZ Technologies Inc. announced the first published clinical review on its TIPSO technology’s ability to provide wireless, in-suite control of viewing and manipulation of images to physicians. Published in the peer-reviewed journal Vascular Disease Management,1 the review tested the technology in 15 consecutive cases. The authors found that the TIPSO AirPad improved workflow in a variety of procedures by minimizing the number of episodes of scrubbing out to view images outside the operating room, thereby reducing procedural time.

TIPSO enables touchless access and navigation of patient imaging records without leaving the sterile workspace. The system offers two wireless devices (TIPSO Beam and TIPSO AirPad) that capture the physician's hand motions and translates them as mouse/keyboard commands used to control radiological images on the workstation. Using either device puts the physician in full control of image review — via picture archiving and communication system (PACS), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), computed tomography (CT) or other intraprocedural modalities — allowing retrieval of any available imaging record. Ultimately, using the TIPSO system could help reduce procedural time and radiation exposure, limit traffic in the angio suite, improve workflow and alleviate the physician’s cognitive load.

Robert Beasley, M.D., MS, FSIR, FSCAI, lead author of the clinical study review and section chief, vascular and interventional radiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, Fla., commented, “Our team found that the TIPSO was useful at various procedural steps, and was able to improve safety by reducing use of contrast agent and exposure to radiation in certain scenarios. It presents a great resource for the angio suite.”

For more information: www.nztech.ca

Reference

1. Vianna S., Yates T., Olivieri B., Beasley R.E. Novel Wireless Technology Platform for Bedside Image Navigation in the Endovascular Suite: Initial Clinical Experience in a Case Series. Vascular Disease Management, February 2019. 2019;16(2):E28-E31

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