News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | January 26, 2016

Nuclear Medicine Tools Could Be Beneficial Against Several Cancers

University of Missouri professors receive U.S. patent for cancer diagnostic and treatment tools

January 26, 2016 — University of Missouri researcher Silvia Jurisson and her interdisciplinary team recently received a U.S. patent for a new delivery method that uses nuclear isotopes to help target, diagnose and treat cancer. The patented method could prove invaluable in battling prostate, pancreatic, breast and small-cell cancers in the body.

“In nuclear medicine, radiotracers are isotopes that, in extremely low concentrations, can be used to image and treat cancer,” said Jurisson, professor of chemistry and radiology in the College of Arts and Science and a research investigator with MU Research Reactor (MURR). “They provide the delivery vehicles necessary to get treatments into the nooks and crannies of the body where cancer cells usually hide.”

Jurisson and her team used three components to create the new delivery method for the peptides and medicine needed to diagnose and treat cancer. Arsenic 72, an imaging and diagnostic isotope, or Arsenic 77, a radiotherapeutic isotope, were attached to trithiol, a stable radioisotope. Trithiol then can be combined with medicine or diagnostic molecules. When the isotope complex is injected, it effectively “seeks out” and binds with cancer cells, delivering the proper medicine.

“Trithiol is shaped a bit like a claw where the ‘fingers’ bind with arsenic and the peptides or antibodies linked to the trithiol carry it to the cancer cell,” Jurisson said. “Our lab worked out the basic chemistry and developed a way to bind arsenic with the trithiol. The next steps are to test the peptide-linked arsenic trithiol complex in mice to make sure the delivery method is sound.”

The early-stage results of this research are promising. If additional studies, including in vivo studies in mice, are successful within the next several years, then working with physicians at MU will be warranted.

The patent, “Radioisotope Trithiol Complexes,” was issued on Oct. 8, 2015. The research team also included Alan Ketring, associate director of the MURR Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Program, and Cathy Cutler, a research professor formerly with the MURR Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Program and an adjunct professor with the MU Department of Bioengineering.

For more information: www.muhealth.org

Related Content

New Data Demonstrates Safety Profile of GammaTile Therapy for Various Brain Tumors
News | Brachytherapy Systems | June 18, 2019
GT Medical Technologies Inc. announced the presentation of clinical data from a prospective study of GammaTile Therapy...
Black Men Less Likely to Adopt Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
News | Prostate Cancer | June 17, 2019
A new study reveals black men are less likely than white men to adopt an active surveillance strategy for their...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019
BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for...
AI Biomarker Demonstrates High Predictive Power for Lung Cancer Immunotherapy
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 31, 2019
Lunit announced an abstract presentation of its artificial intelligence (AI) precision medicine research portfolio at...
Dynamic Digital Radiography Used to Assess Undifferentiated Dyspnea
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | May 29, 2019
A clinical study presented at the American Thoracic Society (ATS) 2019 annual meeting, May 17-22 in Dallas, described...
Leica Biosystems Receives FDA Clearance for Aperio AT2 DX Digital Pathology System
Technology | Digital Pathology | May 29, 2019
Leica Biosystems has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Aperio AT2 DX...
New Blood Test Detects Colorectal Cancer Recurrence Up to 16.5 Months Earlier
News | Oncology Diagnostics | May 28, 2019
A new clinical study shows that Natera's Signatera test identified colorectal cancer recurrence up to 16.5 months...
Study Explores Magnetic Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agent for PET/MRI

Image courtesy of MR Solutions.

News | PET-MRI | May 23, 2019
Researchers from Bourgogne University in Dijon, France, showed that use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (...