News | Nuclear Imaging | June 24, 2016

Novel Portable Diagnostic Tool Pairs Optical and Gamma Imaging

System introduced at SNMMI 2016 combines surface-level optical imaging with scintigraphy to provide multi-dimensional look at the body

June 24, 2016 — Developers of a new portable molecular imaging system debuted their creation at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), June 11-15 in San Diego. The new system combines optical imaging at the surface level and scintigraphy, which captures the physiological function of what lies beneath.

The scintigraphy aspect of the scanner is comprised of a gamma camera that detects tiny radioactive signals emitted from the body after injection of a radionuclide, which interacts with specific physiological functions of the body, so that nuclear medicine physicians and their colleagues can extrapolate information from the radionuclide’s activity.

Optical-gamma imaging could provide a multi-dimensional look at the body by allowing physicians to see a visual representation of molecular data in the same frame as optical images of the skin, the eyes and other surface organs. Unlike most hybrid imaging systems, which typically take up a lot of real estate in healthcare facilities, this technology is small enough to be easily portable.

“This research covers the first patient results obtained with the hybrid optical-gamma camera developed in the U.K. at the Universities of Leicester and Nottingham,” said Alan Perkins, Ph.D., radiological sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom. “This scanner has hand-held potential and can be used in a variety of settings, including the outpatient clinic, patient bedside, operating theatre and intensive care unit.”

For this clinical pilot study, researchers imaged subjects undergoing routine molecular imaging procedures such as bone scans or imaging of the thyroid, eye or lymphatic system. The investigators optimized the image resolution and acquisition time to under five minutes by adopting a 1.5 millimeter-thick scintillator, which picks up gamma rays as they are emitted from within the body, and a 1 millimeter pin-hole collimator, which acts like an aperture to narrow focus on a particular field of view.

Results of the study showed that the optical-gamma camera was highly effective for imaging lymphatic and thyroid tissue, as well as drainage from the tear ducts, or lacrimal glands. Successful absorption of the radionuclides in these targeted areas was clearly seen in tandem with optical images of surface anatomy. This imaging system is still in development and requires further investigation before being made available to wider patient populations.

For more information: www.snmmi.org

Related Content

DOSIsoft Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for Planet Onco Dose Software
Technology | Treatment Planning | June 20, 2019
DOSIsoft announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market Planet...
Bay Labs Announces New Echocardiography Guidance Software Data at ASE 2019 Scientific Sessions
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 20, 2019
Bay Labs announced that new data on the company’s first-of-its-kind deep learning investigational guidance software...
United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Install of uMI 550 Digital PET/CT System
News | PET-CT | June 19, 2019
United Imaging announced the first U.S. clinical installation of the uMI 550 Digital positron emission tomography/...
LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis announced the presentation of two studies assessing the performance and accuracy of the company's...
New Data Demonstrates Safety Profile of GammaTile Therapy for Various Brain Tumors
News | Brachytherapy Systems | June 18, 2019
GT Medical Technologies Inc. announced the presentation of clinical data from a prospective study of GammaTile Therapy...
Black Men Less Likely to Adopt Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
News | Prostate Cancer | June 17, 2019
A new study reveals black men are less likely than white men to adopt an active surveillance strategy for their...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019
BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for...
AI Biomarker Demonstrates High Predictive Power for Lung Cancer Immunotherapy
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 31, 2019
Lunit announced an abstract presentation of its artificial intelligence (AI) precision medicine research portfolio at...