Technology | March 13, 2009

New HemCon Patch Provides More Flexibility

March 13, 2009 – HemCon Medical Technologies is displaying at SIR 2009 its new flexible HemCon Patch designed for use for external, temporary control of bleeding during interventional and diagnostic cardiac catheterization, interventional radiology, electrophysiology and dialysis access procedures.

Offering diagnostic and interventional patients a quick, safe and comfortable post-procedural experience, the HemCon Patch delivers a flexible hemostatic solution where rapid arterial hemostasis is critically important to ensure quality care and safety. It stops bleeding and minimizes risk of artery damage.

As one of the only hemostatic products to obtain an FDA antibacterial barrier claim, the HemCon Patch provides a barrier against a wide spectrum of micro-organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) and Acinetobacter baumannii. This barrier may help to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections for both patients and providers. The HemCon Patch is also suited for patients that take anticoagulant medications or suffer from clotting or bleeding disorders.

For more information: www.hemcon.com

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