News | March 05, 2015

New Breast Density Technology Debuts at ECR Conference

Densitas Research Edition analyzes density using ‘for presentation’ digital mammography images

Densitas, Research Edition, mammography, breast density, ECR 2015

March 5, 2015 — A new research technology was profiled during scientific sessions at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) in Vienna, Austria. Densitas Research Edition assesses mammographic breast density using ‘for presentation’ digital mammography images.

In a presentation focused specifically on the technology itself, study results using 1,823 images showed excellent agreement between Densitas Research Edition density measures and radiologists’ visual assessment. This concept is known as face validity. The research also confirmed the internal reliability of the software, or its ability to consistently generate the same, valid results repeatedly.

Currently, the standard way to assess mammographic density is a radiologist’s visual assessment. Such subjective evaluation is prone to poor reproducibility between two radiologists reading the same image. As well, even the same radiologist could assess an image at different times and report a different result. Densitas Research Edition standardizes the assessment of mammographic density.

The application was also used in a case-control study that looked at Tabár parenchymal patterns and breast cancer risk, using Densitas Research Edition’s percent area mammographic density.

In a poster session, mammographic density measures from the software were compared to typical clinical risk factors in evaluating breast cancer risk during screening mammography.

For more information: www.densitas.ca

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