News | October 02, 2013

New Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Could Cut Down on False Positives

Researchers getting five times more accurate images with sodium MRI device

Sodium MRI mammography systems women's health brigham young utah university

October 2, 2013 — A joint Brigham Young University-University of Utah research team is developing a new breast cancer screening technique that has the potential to reduce false positives and, possibly, minimize the need for invasive biopsies.

Led by BYU electrical engineer Neal Bangerter and University of Utah collaborators Rock Hadley and Joshua Kaggie, the group has created a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device that could improve both the process and accuracy of breast cancer screening by scanning for sodium levels in the breast.

The device is producing as much as five times more accurate images than previous efforts with an emerging methodology called sodium MRI.  Sodium MRI has the potential to improve assessment of breast lesions because sodium concentrations are thought to increase in malignant tumors. Bangerter and his team believe that the addition of sodium MRI to a breast cancer screening exam could provide important additional diagnostic information that will cut down on false positives.

The team has developed a new device used for sodium imaging that is picking up a level of detail and structure not previously achieved.

"This development by Dr. Bangerter and his group represents a major advance in the field of multinuclear MRI of the breast," said Stanford Professor of Radiology Bruce Daniel. "He and his group have invented a way to dramatically boost the sodium signal from the breast, enabling much better, higher resolution sodium MR images to be obtained. This should open the door to new avenues of research into breast cancer."

So far, the technique returns high-quality images in 20 minutes, improving the odds that sodium MRI breast scans could be implemented clinically.

The MRI team's goal is to produce a device capable of obtaining both excellent sodium and good proton images without requiring the patient being screened to be repositioned for multiple scans.

"This method is giving us new physiological information we can't see from other types of images," Bangerter said. "We believe this can aid in early breast cancer detection and characterization while also improving cancer treatment and monitoring."

For more information: www.eurekalert.org

Related Content

Digital Mammography Increases Breast Cancer Detection
News | Mammography | January 16, 2019
The shift from film to digital mammography increased the detection of breast cancer by 14 percent overall in the United...
Artificial Intelligence Used in Clinical Practice to Measure Breast Density
News | Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm measures breast density at the level of an experienced mammographer,...
Machine Learning Uncovers New Insights Into Human Brain Through fMRI
News | Neuro Imaging | January 11, 2019
An interdisciplinary research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has successfully...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Breast Imaging | January 11, 2019
Supplemental screening with ABUS helps personalize breast care for women with dense breasts and offers advanced...
Hypertension With Progressive Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Increases Cognitive Impairment Risk
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2019
Patients with high blood pressure and progression of periventricular white matter hyperintensities showed signs of...
Electronic Brachytherapy Effective in Long-Term Study of 1,000 Early-Stage Breast Cancers
News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women's Healthcare | January 07, 2019
Breast cancer recurrence rates of patients treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) using the Xoft Axxent...
Breast Cancer Patients Have Less Heart Damage With Heart Drug and Trastuzumab
News | Cardio-oncology | January 03, 2019
Breast cancer patients who take a heart drug at the same time as trastuzumab have less heart damage, according to a...
First Arterial and Venous Atlas of the Human Brain Released
News | Neuro Imaging | January 02, 2019
January 2, 2019 — Imagine an atlas containing an image bank of the blood vessels of the...
MRI Effective for Monitoring Liver Fat in Obese Patients
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 28, 2018
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a safe, noninvasive way to monitor liver fat levels in people who undergo...