News | September 27, 2010

Multileaf Collimator Prototype on Display

Elekta Symmetry

September 27, 2010 — Several products for image guidance, digital control, field shaping and respiratory motion management for radiation oncology were presented at the 2010 meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), Sept. 12-16, in Barcelona, Spain.

The Elekta booth featured a 3-D hologram theater designed to show visitors how the company equips clinicians with the tools they need to optimize patient care. Elekta also exhibited several new, developing and field-proven solutions, including:

- Agility multileaf collimator (MLC) prototype, featuring a leaf positioning system that utilizes optical technology to verify and ensure accuracy. In addition, Agility will offer 160 5 mm leaves across the full 40 by 40 cm field to provide a single, versatile MLC for a spectrum of applications.

- Integrity digital linear accelerator control, now in its sixth generation, synchronizes multiple linac operations through a single centralized control system to increase performance and reduce the risk of errors.

- Intuity image guidance for tumors and critical structures, offering superior image quality combined with the largest available image size.

- Symmetry respiratory motion management for lung tumor treatment, which enables clinicians to reduce margins, account for baseline shifts and employ uninterrupted treatment delivery while the patient breathes freely.

- Monaco treatment planning with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It optimizes single or multiple noncoplanar arcs simultaneously, providing flexibility and control for complex treatment plans.

- Clarity soft tissue visualization, capable of integrating with any linac platform.

- Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion stereotactic radiosurgery system for treatment of multiple metastases with speed and precision.

Agility and Integrity are works-in-progress and not available for sale or distribution. Clarity is not for sale or distribution in all regions.

Related Content

Proton Therapy Lowers Risk of Side Effects Compared to Conventional Radiation
News | Proton Therapy | May 23, 2019
Cancer patients getting proton therapy instead of traditional photon radiation are at a significantly lower risk of...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Varian Acquiring Cancer Treatment Services International
News | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
Varian Medical Systems announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire India’s Cancer Treatment...
Videos | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
This is a walk through of the ViewRay MRIdian MRI-guided radiotherapy system installed at ...
Partial Breast Irradiation Effective, Convenient Treatment Option for Low-Risk Breast Cancer
News | Radiation Therapy | May 20, 2019
Partial breast irradiation produces similar long-term survival rates and risk for recurrence compared with whole breast...
Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | May 20, 2019
This is a quick walk-around video showing the ...
360 Photos | Cardiac Imaging | May 20, 2019
A 360 degree photo view of a Siemens Healthineers digital radiography (DR) room install and mobile Carestream DRX mob
Brain images that have been pre-reviewed by the Viz.AI artificial intelligence software to identify a stroke. The software automatically sends and alert to the attending physician's smartphone with links to the imaging for a final human assessment to help speed the time to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the type of stroke, quick action is needed to either activate the neuro-interventional lab or to administer tPA. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Brain images that have been pre-reviewed by the Viz.AI artificial intelligence software to identify a stroke. The software automatically sends and alert to the attending physician's smartphone with links to the imaging for a final human assessment to help speed the time to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the type of stroke, quick action is needed to either activate the neuro-interventional lab or to administer tPA. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | May 17, 2019 | Inga Shugalo
With its increasing role in medical imaging,...
Videos | Advanced Visualization | May 16, 2019
This is an example of how virtual reality is being used in neuro-radiology to better evaluate patients using advanced